Working with families in the Inherited Cardiac Arrhythmia Program to define different aspects of inherited cardiac conditions is both an exciting challenge and incredible privilege. Each day brings new situations and different scenarios, but adopting a team approach to each different problem provides great satisfaction and will always be a unique and very humbling experience.

MEDIA

Caregiver Profile

Caregiver Profile

Meet Dr. Dominic J.R. Abrams

EDUCATION

Undergraduate Degree

  • St. Mary's Hospital and The Royal Postgraduate Medical Schools , 1991 , London , United Kingdom

Medical School

  • St. Mary's Hospital/Imperial College , 1994 , London , United Kingdom

Internship

  • St. Mary's Hospital , 1995 , London , Uited Kingdom

Residency

Pediatric
  • St. Mary’s, St. Thomas’, Northwick Park, Royal Brompton & Harefield Hospitals , 1999 , London , United Kingdom

Fellowship

Cardiac Electrophysiology
  • Royal Brompton & Harefield, St. Bartholomew’s and The Heart/University College Hospitals , 2007 , London , United Kingdom

Philosophy of Care

My job as a cardiac electrophysiologist provides an amazing contrast between the varied world of human cardiac genetics and the myriad of different cardiac arrhythmias managed interventionally in the cardiac electrophysiology laboratory.

From the early days of my medical training, I have been fascinated by the complex relationship between human genetics and the associated clinical conditions - how one simple molecular change can lead to such wide ranging and varied conditions, and how understanding human genetics has helped unlock different biological pathways involved in inherited heart disorders. Working with families in the Inherited Cardiac Arrhythmia Program to define different aspects of inherited cardiac conditions is both an exciting challenge and incredible privilege.  Each day brings new situations and different scenarios, but adopting a team approach to each different problem provides great satisfaction and will always be a unique and very humbling experience.

Equally challenging and satisfying, and yet requiring a complete different approach, is the interventional approach to arrhythmia management.  As a medical student watching a presentation of the treatment of a young patient with highly symptomatic Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, and seeing a picture of him on the summit of Mt. Kilimanjaro after a successful ablation was an inspirational and highly motivating experience.  To be able to eliminate symptoms in patients with arrhythmia allowing them to resume a normal quality of life remains as rewarding and satisfying today as performing my first ablation.

PROFESSIONAL HISTORY

I received my medical education and post-graduate training in the United Kingdom, specializing in cardiology and electrophysiology.  My fellowships were in both pediatric and adult cardiology, and in 2007 I was appointed as a Consultant Cardiologist and Electrophysiologist at St. Bartholomew’s Hospital, the largest adult electrophysiology center in the UK, and also continued to perform pediatric electrophysiology at Great Ormond Street Hospital.  This dual appointment allowed for detailed evaluation of all family members with varying inherited cardiac condition, including ion channel disorders and cardiomyopathies.  In Boston we have developed a rapid access Inherited Cardiac Arrhythmia Program for all patients with a confirmed or suspected inherited/genetic component to their condition, which runs between Boston Children’s and Brigham & Women’s Hospitals allowing for continued clinical care within the family irrespective of age.  Patients are comprehensively investigated, including clinical and genetic diagnosis and risk stratification, and appropriate management strategies implemented, including cascade screening across extensive families.  We are currently developing a major collaboration with colleagues across New England.  

As an adult and pediatric electrophysiologist I also have extensive experience in the management of arrhythmias in the adult congenital population and this has been a major area of clinical and research activity.