EDUCATION

Undergraduate Degree

  • University of Rhode Island , 1996 , Kingston , RI

Philosophy of Care

Patient safety is the ultimate driver behind everything we do, including making medication use safer in children by personalizing therapy and ensuring robust processes exist for medication preparation and delivery.

PROFESSIONAL HISTORY

I am a clinical pharmacist and have practiced pediatric pharmacy for more than 20 years, currently serving as the Director of the Clinical Pharmacogenomics Service and the Manager for ED and ICU Pharmacy Services.

 

Dr. Manzi serves as an expert for the Pharmacy program for Boston Children's Hospital Precision Medicine Service. For more information about the Precision Medicine Service please visit bostonchildrens.org/precisionmed.

CERTIFICATIONS

  • Board Certified Pediatric Pharmacotherapy Specialist

PUBLICATIONS

Publications powered by Harvard Catalyst Profiles

  1. Patients dispensed medications with actionable pharmacogenomic biomarkers: rates and characteristics. Genet Med. 2021 Jan 08. View abstract
  2. Adverse drug event presentation and tracking (ADEPT): semiautomated, high throughput pharmacovigilance using real-world data. JAMIA Open. 2020 Oct; 3(3):413-421. View abstract
  3. Benzalkonium Chloride in Albuterol Solutions: Time for a Change? Pediatrics. 2020 04; 145(4). View abstract
  4. Off-label use of prescription analgesics among hospitalized children in the United States. Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2020 04; 29(4):474-481. View abstract
  5. Adverse drug event rates in pediatric pulmonary hypertension: a comparison of real-world data sources. J Am Med Inform Assoc. 2020 02 01; 27(2):294-300. View abstract
  6. Recurrent SLC1A2 variants cause epilepsy via a dominant negative mechanism. Ann Neurol. 2019 06; 85(6):921-926. View abstract
  7. Whole-Exome Sequencing Enables a Precision Medicine Approach for Kidney Transplant Recipients. J Am Soc Nephrol. 2019 02; 30(2):201-215. View abstract
  8. Pharmacist Outpatient Prescription Review in the Emergency Department: A Pediatric Tertiary Hospital Experience. Pediatr Emerg Care. 2018 Jul; 34(7):497-500. View abstract
  9. HLA-A*31:01 and Oxcarbazepine-Induced DRESS in a Patient With Seizures and Complete DCX Deletion. Pediatrics. 2018 04; 141(Suppl 5):S434-S438. View abstract
  10. Initial Pain Management in Pediatric Acute Pancreatitis: Opioid Versus Non-opioid. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2018 02; 66(2):295-298. View abstract
  11. Practical considerations for implementing genomic information resources. Experiences from eMERGE and CSER. Appl Clin Inform. 2016 09 21; 7(3):870-82. View abstract
  12. Creating a scalable clinical pharmacogenomics service with automated interpretation and medical record result integration - experience from a pediatric tertiary care facility. J Am Med Inform Assoc. 2017 01; 24(1):74-80. View abstract
  13. Lacerations and Embedded Needles Caused by Epinephrine Autoinjector Use in Children. Ann Emerg Med. 2016 Mar; 67(3):307-315.e8. View abstract
  14. Practical considerations in genomic decision support: The eMERGE experience. J Pathol Inform. 2015; 6:50. View abstract
  15. Electronic medication reconciliation and medication errors. Int J Qual Health Care. 2015 Aug; 27(4):314-9. View abstract
  16. 13-year-old girl with recurrent, episodic, persistent vomiting: out of the pot and into the fire. Pediatrics. 2015 Apr; 135(4):e1060-3. View abstract
  17. Utility of a dedicated pediatric cardiac anticoagulation program: the Boston Children's Hospital experience. Pediatr Cardiol. 2015 Apr; 36(4):842-50. View abstract
  18. Misinterpretation of TPMT by a DTC genetic testing company. Clin Pharmacol Ther. 2014 Jun; 95(6):598-600. View abstract
  19. Pharmacointeraction network models predict unknown drug-drug interactions. PLoS One. 2013; 8(4):e61468. View abstract
  20. Development of a scalable pharmacogenomic clinical decision support service. AMIA Jt Summits Transl Sci Proc. 2013; 2013:60. View abstract
  21. Dispensing medications at the hospital upon discharge from an emergency department. Pediatrics. 2012 Feb; 129(2):e562. View abstract
  22. Predicting adverse drug events using pharmacological network models. Sci Transl Med. 2011 Dec 21; 3(114):114ra127. View abstract
  23. Response to challenges and lessons learned from Hurricanes Katrina and Rita: a national perspective. Pediatrics. 2011 Aug; 128 Suppl 1:S31-3. View abstract
  24. Patients providing the answers: narrowing the gap in data quality for emergency care. Qual Saf Health Care. 2010 Oct; 19(5):e34. View abstract
  25. Getting the data right: information accuracy in pediatric emergency medicine. Qual Saf Health Care. 2006 Aug; 15(4):296-301. View abstract
  26. FEMA's organized response with a pediatric subspecialty team: the National Disaster Medical System response: a pediatric perspective. Pediatrics. 2006 May; 117(5 Pt 3):S405-11. View abstract
  27. Preprocedural fasting state and adverse events in children undergoing procedural sedation and analgesia in a pediatric emergency department. Ann Emerg Med. 2003 Nov; 42(5):636-46. View abstract
  28. Methylphenidate produces a false-positive urine amphetamine screen. Pediatr Emerg Care. 2002 Oct; 18(5):401. View abstract