MEDIA

Caregiver Profile

Caregiver Profile

Meet Dr. Nancy Rodig

EDUCATION

Undergraduate Degree

  • College of the Holy Cross , 1990 , Worcester , MA

Medical School

  • Washington University , 1995 , St Louis , MO

Internship

Pediatrics
  • St. Louis Children's Hospital , 1996 , St Louis , MO

Residency

Pediatrics
  • St. Louis Children's Hospital , 1998 , St Louis , MO

Fellowship

Pediatric Nephrology
  • Boston Children's Hospital , 2002 , Boston , MA

PROFESSIONAL HISTORY

Dr. Rodig has been with Boston Children's Hospital since 1999. In addition to her role as medical director of the Renal Transplant Program, she is active within the General Renal Program and Dialysis Unit. Her clinical and research interests focus on translational mechanisms related to the outcome and treatment of pediatric patients with chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease. Her research interests include growth outcomes in children with chronic kidney disease and general outcomes after kidney transplantation in the context of immunosuppression minimization protocols. In addition to holding an academic appointment as an assistant professor in pediatrics at Harvard Medical School, Dr. Rodig is a member of International Pediatric Nephrology Association, the American Society of Nephrology, the International Society of Nephrology and the American Society of Transplantation.

CERTIFICATIONS

  • American Board of Pediatrics, General Pediatrics
  • American Board of Pediatrics, Pediatric Nephrology

PUBLICATIONS

Publications powered by Harvard Catalyst Profiles

  1. Longitudinal outcomes of body mass index in overweight and obese children with chronic kidney disease. Pediatr Nephrol. 2021 Jan 21. View abstract
  2. COVID-19 in pediatric kidney transplantation: The Improving Renal Outcomes Collaborative. Am J Transplant. 2021 Jan 16. View abstract
  3. Incidence and risk factors of kidney allograft loss due to BK nephropathy in the pediatric population: A retrospective analysis of the UNOS/OPTN database. Pediatr Transplant. 2020 Nov 27; e13927. View abstract
  4. Expecting the unexpected: COVID-19 in Kidney Transplant Recipients within United Network for Organ Sharing Region 1. Transpl Int. 2020 12; 33(12):1843-1844. View abstract
  5. Mutations of the Transcriptional Corepressor ZMYM2 Cause Syndromic Urinary Tract Malformations. Am J Hum Genet. 2020 10 01; 107(4):727-742. View abstract
  6. Early outcomes comparing induction with antithymocyte globulin vs alemtuzumab in two steroid-avoidance protocols in pediatric renal transplantation. Pediatr Transplant. 2020 05; 24(3):e13685. View abstract
  7. Perioperative renal transplantation management in small children using adult-sized living or deceased donor kidneys: A single-center experience. Pediatr Transplant. 2019 11; 23(7):e13553. View abstract
  8. Whole-Exome Sequencing Enables a Precision Medicine Approach for Kidney Transplant Recipients. J Am Soc Nephrol. 2019 02; 30(2):201-215. View abstract
  9. New England BK consortium: Regional survey of BK screening and management protocols in comparison to published consensus guidelines. Transpl Infect Dis. 2018 Dec; 20(6):e12985. View abstract
  10. Whole-Exome Sequencing Identifies Causative Mutations in Families with Congenital Anomalies of the Kidney and Urinary Tract. J Am Soc Nephrol. 2018 09; 29(9):2348-2361. View abstract
  11. Whole Exome Sequencing Reveals a Monogenic Cause of Disease in ˜43% of 35 Families With Midaortic Syndrome. Hypertension. 2018 04; 71(4):691-699. View abstract
  12. Bilateral native nephrectomy to reduce oxalate stores in children at the time of combined liver-kidney transplantation for primary hyperoxaluria type 1. Pediatr Nephrol. 2018 05; 33(5):881-887. View abstract
  13. Whole Exome Sequencing of Patients with Steroid-Resistant Nephrotic Syndrome. Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2018 01 06; 13(1):53-62. View abstract
  14. Whole exome sequencing frequently detects a monogenic cause in early onset nephrolithiasis and nephrocalcinosis. Kidney Int. 2018 01; 93(1):204-213. View abstract
  15. Analysis of 24 genes reveals a monogenic cause in 11.1% of cases with steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome at a single center. Pediatr Nephrol. 2018 02; 33(2):305-314. View abstract
  16. A Regional Evaluation of Survival of Infants with End-Stage Renal Disease. Neonatology. 2017; 112(1):73-79. View abstract
  17. Urinary NGAL deficiency in recurrent urinary tract infections. Pediatr Nephrol. 2017 06; 32(6):1077-1080. View abstract
  18. Renal involvement in the immunodysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked (IPEX) disorder. Pediatr Nephrol. 2015 Jul; 30(7):1197-202. View abstract
  19. Treatment and outcomes of immune cytopenias following solid organ transplant in children. Pediatr Blood Cancer. 2015 02; 62(2):214-218. View abstract
  20. Methylmalonic acidemia: a megamitochondrial disorder affecting the kidney. Pediatr Nephrol. 2014 Nov; 29(11):2139-46. View abstract
  21. Growth in children with chronic kidney disease: a report from the Chronic Kidney Disease in Children Study. Pediatr Nephrol. 2014 Oct; 29(10):1987-95. View abstract
  22. Update of PAX2 mutations in renal coloboma syndrome and establishment of a locus-specific database. Hum Mutat. 2012 Mar; 33(3):457-66. View abstract
  23. Rapid reversal of uremic neuropathy following renal transplantation in an adolescent. Pediatr Transplant. 2012 Nov; 16(7):E296-300. View abstract
  24. Risk factors for urinary tract infection after renal transplantation and its impact on graft function in children and young adults. J Urol. 2010 Oct; 184(4):1462-7. View abstract
  25. Central nervous system lymphoproliferative disorder in pediatric kidney transplant recipients. Pediatr Transplant. 2006 Jun; 10(4):505-12. View abstract
  26. Acute arsenic poisoning in two siblings. Pediatrics. 2005 Jul; 116(1):249-57. View abstract
  27. Endothelial expression of PD-L1 and PD-L2 down-regulates CD8+ T cell activation and cytolysis. Eur J Immunol. 2003 Nov; 33(11):3117-26. View abstract