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Researcher | Research Overview

The goal of my research is to identify modifiable dietary and behavioral risk factors in early life associated with childhood health outcomes, particularly body composition and cardiometabolic risk. Since 2005, I have been a co-investigator for Project Viva, an NIH-funded pre-birth longitudinal cohort of mother-child dyads that provides the main database for my research.  Within Project Viva, I led studies showing that early solid food introduction was associated with higher risk of obesity in predominantly formula-fed infants, and that cesarean delivery was associated with child obesity.  My current clinical research focuses on risk factors and management of feeding difficulties and poor weight gain; malnutrition screening in pediatric inpatients; and the effects of modified fat breast milk on nutritional status of infants with congenital heart disease. 

 

Researcher | Research Background

Dr. Huh is board-certified in both pediatric gastroenterology and nutrition. She obtained her medical degree at the University of Western Ontario in Canada. She completed a clinical and research fellowship in the Harvard Medical School Program in Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, and obtained her Master of Public Health degree at the Harvard School of Public Health.  Dr. Huh is Associate Director for the Center for Nutrition at Boston Children’s Hospital and an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School.  In addition to practicing general pediatric gastroenterology, she directs the Growth and Nutrition Program, a multidisciplinary program offering diagnosis and treatment for children with failure-to-thrive and feeding difficulties.  Dr. Huh has served on the Training and Nutrition Committees for the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (NASPGHAN).  She has taught gastroenterology, nutrition, clinical epidemiology, and critical interpretation of medical literature to medical students, pediatric residents, and fellows.  She directs a 4th-year nutrition elective for medical students, and directs nutrition education for pediatric residents and fellows at Boston Children’s Hospital.  She is a member of the Medical Advisory Board for the Mothers’ Milk Bank of New England.

 

Selected Publications

  1. Huh SY, Rifas-Shiman SL, Kleinman KP, Rich-Edwards JW, Lipshultz SE, Gillman MW.  Maternal protein intake is not associated with infant blood pressure.  International Journal of Epidemiology 2005; 34(2):378-84. 
  2. Huh SY, Gordon CM. Vitamin D deficiency in children and adolescents: epidemiology, impact and treatment.  Rev Endo Metab Dis 2008; Jun;9(2):161-170.
  3. Huh SY, Feldman HA, Cox, J, Gordon CM. Prevalence of transient hyperphosphatasemia among healthy infants and toddlers. Pediatrics 2009; 124(2):703-9.
  4. Huh SY, Rifas-Shiman S, Rich-Edwards JW, Taveras EM, Gillman MW. Prospective association between milk intake and adiposity in preschool age children. J Am Diet Assoc 2010; 110(4):563-70.
  5. Huh SY,* Rifas-Shiman SL,* Oken E, Taveras EM, Gillman MW. Timing of solid food introduction and risk of obesity in preschool age children.  Pediatrics 2011; 127(3):e544-51. *These authors contributed equally to this work and hold shared first authorship.  
  6. Gordon C, Gordon L, Snyder BD, Nazarian A, Quinn N, Huh S, Giobbie-Hurder A, Neuberg D, Cleveland R, Kleinman M, Kieran M.  Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria is a Skeletal Dysplasia. Journal of Bone and Mineral Research 2011; 26(7):1670-9. 
  7. Huh SY, Rifas-Shiman SL, Zera C, Oken E, Rich-Edwards J, Weiss ST, Gillman MW. Delivery by caesarean section and risk of obesity in preschool age children.  Arch Dis Child 2012;97(7):610-6.
  8. Topor LS, Borus JS, Aspinwall S, Gilbert CL, Gordon CM, Huh SY. Fractures among inpatients in a pediatric hospital.  Hosp Pediatr 2015: in press.

Researcher | Publications