The greatest joy of my practice is being able to support families as their infants grow into childhood and beyond.

EDUCATION

Undergraduate Degree

  • Harvard University , 2002 , Cambridge , MA

Medical School

  • University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine , 2007 , Philadelphia , PA

Residency

  • Children's Hospital of Philadelphia , 2009 , Philadelphia , PA

Residency

Pediatric Neurology
  • Boston Children's Hospital , 2012 , Boston , MA

Fellowship

Behavioral Neurology
  • Boston Children's Hospital , 2014 , Boston , MA

Philosophy of Care

As the child of a clinical psychologist and scientist, I have always been interested in linking human experience with underlying biology. As part of the Cardiac Neurodevelopmental Program, I have the wonderful privilege of being able to work with children and their families over many years. The greatest joy of my practice is being able to support families as their infants grow into childhood and beyond.

My focus is to be a compassionate physician who is continually bringing the latest in clinical research on cardioneurology to the precious children entrusted to us.

PROFESSIONAL HISTORY

I am a neurologist focusing on understanding neurological outcomes in congenital heart disease. Through my clinical care, I am uniquely situated to allow my patient experiences to inform our research. At the same time, I am able to provide families with information about the latest research advances in the field. By intertwining clinical care and research, I strive to bring a richer perspective to both research and to my patients and their families.


My clinical work is as a neurologist with the Cardiac Neurodevelopmental Neurology Program. Here I treat conditions such as developmental delay, motor concerns, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and learning disabilities. I also see patients in the neurology consultation service.


My research lies at the intersection of neurology and cardiology, aiming to illuminate the neurobiological underpinnings of neurodevelopmental impairment in congenital heart disease.


Currently, I am the Principal Investigator of a fetal MRI study that investigates fetal brain measurements in congenital heart disease to determine whether in utero markers of abnormal brain development can be identified. The ultimate goal of the study is to establish neurobiological targets for fetal neuroprotective intervention and identify those patients most likely to benefit from such therapy.

CERTIFICATIONS

  • American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology, Child and Adolescent Neurology

PUBLICATIONS

Publications powered by Harvard Catalyst Profiles

  1. Association between Quantitative MR Markers of Cortical Evolving Organization and Gene Expression during Human Prenatal Brain Development. Cereb Cortex. 2021 Jul 05; 31(8):3610-3621. View abstract
  2. Abnormal Right-Hemispheric Sulcal Patterns Correlate with Executive Function in Adolescents with Tetralogy of Fallot. Cereb Cortex. 2021 May 03. View abstract
  3. A Deep Attentive Convolutional Neural Network for Automatic Cortical Plate Segmentation in Fetal MRI. IEEE Trans Med Imaging. 2021 04; 40(4):1123-1133. View abstract
  4. Tractography of the Cerebellar Peduncles in Second- and Third-Trimester Fetuses. AJNR Am J Neuroradiol. 2021 01; 42(1):194-200. View abstract
  5. Fetal Cortical Plate Segmentation Using Fully Convolutional Networks With Multiple Plane Aggregation. Front Neurosci. 2020; 14:591683. View abstract
  6. Regional Brain Growth Trajectories in Fetuses with Congenital Heart Disease. Ann Neurol. 2021 01; 89(1):143-157. View abstract
  7. Neurodevelopmental evaluation for school-age children with congenital heart disease: recommendations from the cardiac neurodevelopmental outcome collaborative. Cardiol Young. 2020 Nov; 30(11):1623-1636. View abstract
  8. Neurodevelopmental evaluation strategies for children with congenital heart disease aged birth through 5 years: recommendations from the cardiac neurodevelopmental outcome collaborative. Cardiol Young. 2020 Nov; 30(11):1609-1622. View abstract
  9. Association of Isolated Congenital Heart Disease with Fetal Brain Maturation. AJNR Am J Neuroradiol. 2020 08; 41(8):1525-1531. View abstract
  10. Spatiotemporal Differences in the Regional Cortical Plate and Subplate Volume Growth during Fetal Development. Cereb Cortex. 2020 06 30; 30(8):4438-4453. View abstract
  11. Temporal Patterns of Emergence and Spatial Distribution of Sulcal Pits During Fetal Life. Cereb Cortex. 2020 06 01; 30(7):4257-4268. View abstract
  12. In vivo characterization of emerging white matter microstructure in the fetal brain in the third trimester. Hum Brain Mapp. 2020 08 15; 41(12):3177-3185. View abstract
  13. Quantitative In vivo MRI Assessment of Structural Asymmetries and Sexual Dimorphism of Transient Fetal Compartments in the Human Brain. Cereb Cortex. 2020 03 14; 30(3):1752-1767. View abstract
  14. Early-Emerging Sulcal Patterns Are Atypical in Fetuses with Congenital Heart Disease. Cereb Cortex. 2019 07 22; 29(8):3605-3616. View abstract
  15. Correction of d-Transposition of the Great Arteries Sooner Rather Than Later. Circulation. 2019 06 11; 139(24):2739-2741. View abstract
  16. Early Neurodevelopmental Outcomes in Children Supported with ECMO for Cardiac Indications. Pediatr Cardiol. 2019 Jun; 40(5):1072-1083. View abstract
  17. Ascending Aorta Size at Birth Predicts White Matter Microstructure in Adolescents Who Underwent Fontan Palliation. J Am Heart Assoc. 2018 12 18; 7(24):e010395. View abstract
  18. Automatic labeling of cortical sulci for the human fetal brain based on spatio-temporal information of gyrification. Neuroimage. 2019 03; 188:473-482. View abstract
  19. Tract-Specific Group Analysis in Fetal Cohorts Using in utero Diffusion Tensor Imaging. Med Image Comput Comput Assist Interv. 2018 Sep; 11072:28-35. View abstract
  20. Disorganized Patterns of Sulcal Position in Fetal Brains with Agenesis of Corpus Callosum. Cereb Cortex. 2018 09 01; 28(9):3192-3203. View abstract
  21. Fetal brain growth portrayed by a spatiotemporal diffusion tensor MRI atlas computed from in utero images. Neuroimage. 2019 01 15; 185:593-608. View abstract
  22. Genetic contribution to neurodevelopmental outcomes in congenital heart disease: are some patients predetermined to have developmental delay? Curr Opin Pediatr. 2017 10; 29(5):529-533. View abstract
  23. Quantitative Folding Pattern Analysis of Early Primary Sulci in Human Fetuses with Brain Abnormalities. AJNR Am J Neuroradiol. 2017 Jul; 38(7):1449-1455. View abstract
  24. Temporal slice registration and robust diffusion-tensor reconstruction for improved fetal brain structural connectivity analysis. Neuroimage. 2017 08 01; 156:475-488. View abstract
  25. A normative spatiotemporal MRI atlas of the fetal brain for automatic segmentation and analysis of early brain growth. Sci Rep. 2017 03 28; 7(1):476. View abstract
  26. White Matter Volume Predicts Language Development in Congenital Heart Disease. J Pediatr. 2017 02; 181:42-48.e2. View abstract
  27. A mixed bag: Differential influences of oxygenation and perfusion on brain development in congenital heart disease. J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2016 10; 152(4):960-1. View abstract
  28. Cardiology patient page. Neurodevelopmental outcomes in congenital heart disease. Circulation. 2014 Sep 30; 130(14):e124-6. View abstract
  29. White matter microstructure and cognition in adolescents with congenital heart disease. J Pediatr. 2014 Nov; 165(5):936-44.e1-2. View abstract
  30. Copy number variation plays an important role in clinical epilepsy. Ann Neurol. 2014 Jun; 75(6):943-58. View abstract
  31. Overestimates of survival after HAART: implications for global scale-up efforts. PLoS One. 2008 Mar 05; 3(3):e1725. View abstract
  32. Risk-adjusting outcomes of mental health and substance-related care: a review of the literature. Harv Rev Psychiatry. 2007 Mar-Apr; 15(2):52-69. View abstract
  33. Diagnostic accuracy of CD4 cell count increase for virologic response after initiating highly active antiretroviral therapy. AIDS. 2006 Aug 01; 20(12):1613-9. View abstract
  34. Quality measurement in health care: a need for leadership amid a new federalism. Harv Rev Psychiatry. 2003 Jul-Aug; 11(4):215-9. View abstract