MEDIA

Caregiver Profile

Caregiver Profile

Meet Dr. Deborah R. Stein

EDUCATION

Undergraduate Degree

  • Tufts University , 2000 , Boston , MA

Medical School

  • Tufts University School of Medicine , 2005 , Boston , MA

Internship

  • Floating Hospital for Children Tufts Medical Center , 2006 , Boston , MA

Residency

Pediatrics
  • Floating Hospital for Children Tufts Medical Center , 2008 , Boston , MA

Fellowship

Pediatric Nephrology
  • Boston Children's Hospital , 2011 , Boston , MA

Philosophy of Care

I entered medical school with many interests, but my degree in chemistry and prior work as a chemist made nephrology a natural fit. I enjoy providing both acute and chronic care for patients with renal conditions.

PROFESSIONAL HISTORY

Dr. Deborah Stein grew up in the Boston area, where she completed high school and attended Tufts University, where she was a member of the swim team. After obtaining a degree in chemistry and working in industry, she returned to Tufts University School of Medicine where she completed medical school. She continued at Floating Hospital for Children for residency and then Boston Children’s Hospital for training in Pediatric Nephrology. She is board-certified in Pediatrics and Pediatric Nephrology, and has been a member of the faculty since 2011 when she completed her training.

Dr. Stein is an active member of the American Society of Pediatric Nephrology as well as multiple other professional societies. She has worked with Open Pediatrics to develop online simulators to teach medical professionals about dialysis in children, which won the 2016 American Society of Nephrology Innovations in Kidney Education Award. She was named to the Boston Combined Residency Program Faculty Teaching Honor Roll for the 2017-2018 academic year.

CERTIFICATIONS

  • American Board of Pediatrics, General Pediatrics
  • American Board of Pediatrics, Pediatric Nephrology

PUBLICATIONS

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  1. Late-onset kidney failure in survivors of childhood cancer: a report from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study. Eur J Cancer. 2021 Sep; 155:216-226. View abstract
  2. Surgical management of pediatric renovascular hypertension and midaortic syndrome at a single-center multidisciplinary program. J Vasc Surg. 2021 07; 74(1):79-89.e2. View abstract
  3. Mutations of the Transcriptional Corepressor ZMYM2 Cause Syndromic Urinary Tract Malformations. Am J Hum Genet. 2020 10 01; 107(4):727-742. View abstract
  4. Phenotype expansion of heterozygous FOXC1 pathogenic variants toward involvement of congenital anomalies of the kidneys and urinary tract (CAKUT). Genet Med. 2020 10; 22(10):1673-1681. View abstract
  5. Reconsidering Genetic Testing for Neonatal Polycystic Kidney Disease. Kidney Int Rep. 2020 Aug; 5(8):1316-1319. View abstract
  6. Correction to: Prospective pediatric study comparing glomerular filtration rate estimates based on motion-robust dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and serum creatinine (eGFR) to 99mTc DTPA. Pediatr Radiol. 2020 May; 50(5):755-756. View abstract
  7. Prospective pediatric study comparing glomerular filtration rate estimates based on motion-robust dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and serum creatinine (eGFR) to 99mTc DTPA. Pediatr Radiol. 2020 05; 50(5):698-705. View abstract
  8. Renal outcomes of neonates with early presentation of posterior urethral valves: a 10-year single center experience. J Perinatol. 2020 01; 40(1):112-117. View abstract
  9. Whole-Exome Sequencing Enables a Precision Medicine Approach for Kidney Transplant Recipients. J Am Soc Nephrol. 2019 02; 30(2):201-215. View abstract
  10. Whole-Exome Sequencing Identifies Causative Mutations in Families with Congenital Anomalies of the Kidney and Urinary Tract. J Am Soc Nephrol. 2018 09; 29(9):2348-2361. View abstract
  11. Mesenteric Artery Growth Improves Circulation (MAGIC) in Midaortic Syndrome. Ann Surg. 2018 06; 267(6):e109-e111. View abstract
  12. Teaching Pediatric Peritoneal Dialysis Globally through Virtual Simulation. Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2018 06 07; 13(6):900-906. View abstract
  13. Acute Pancreatitis in a Patient with Maple Syrup Urine Disease: A Management Paradox. J Pediatr. 2018 07; 198:313-316. View abstract
  14. Whole Exome Sequencing Reveals a Monogenic Cause of Disease in ˜43% of 35 Families With Midaortic Syndrome. Hypertension. 2018 04; 71(4):691-699. View abstract
  15. Tissue expander-stimulated lengthening of arteries for the treatment of midaortic syndrome in children. J Vasc Surg. 2018 06; 67(6):1664-1672. View abstract
  16. Whole Exome Sequencing of Patients with Steroid-Resistant Nephrotic Syndrome. Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2018 01 06; 13(1):53-62. View abstract
  17. Whole exome sequencing frequently detects a monogenic cause in early onset nephrolithiasis and nephrocalcinosis. Kidney Int. 2018 01; 93(1):204-213. View abstract
  18. Analysis of 24 genes reveals a monogenic cause in 11.1% of cases with steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome at a single center. Pediatr Nephrol. 2018 02; 33(2):305-314. View abstract
  19. Evaluation and treatment of hypertensive crises in children. Integr Blood Press Control. 2016; 9:49-58. View abstract
  20. Multidisciplinary consensus on the classification of prenatal and postnatal urinary tract dilation (UTD classification system). J Pediatr Urol. 2014 Dec; 10(6):982-98. View abstract
  21. Midaortic syndrome: 30 years of experience with medical, endovascular and surgical management. Pediatr Nephrol. 2013 Oct; 28(10):2023-33. View abstract
  22. Vitamin D status in children with chronic kidney disease. Pediatr Nephrol. 2012 Aug; 27(8):1341-50. View abstract
  23. Enhancing vapor sensor discrimination by mimicking a canine nasal cavity flow environment. J Am Chem Soc. 2003 Apr 02; 125(13):3684-5. View abstract