Good patient care should incorporate competence, compassion and clarity.

MEDICAL SERVICES

Departments

Programs

Languages

  • English

EDUCATION

Medical School

  • University of Wisconsin Medical School , 2004 , Madison , WI

Internship

  • Tufts New England Medical Center , 2006 , Boston , MA

Residency

  • Boston Children's Hospital , 2009 , Boston , MA

Fellowship

  • Boston Children's Hospital , 2010 , Boston , MA

Philosophy of Care

There is an abundance of research showing the effects of sleep on daytime cognition, behavior and mood. Improving patients sleep can not only help the child in these domains but also family functioning.

PROFESSIONAL HISTORY

I am a pediatric neurologist and sleep medicine physician specializing in narcolepsy and sleep problems of children with neurological disorders. Over the last several years of working at Boston Children’s Hospital (BCH), I have developed expertise in pediatric sleep neurology, and I am often invited to speak at national and regional meetings. I have received foundation grants to define the cognitive effects of disturbed sleep in children, and I am the site PI for a clinical trial of sodium oxybate in pediatric narcolepsy. My research on improving the diagnosis of narcolepsy has been published in SLEEP, and I recently received a foundation grant to develop a clinical screening tool for pediatric hypersomnias. I devote approximately 50% of my time to clinical care, 25% to clinical research, 15% on medical education, and 10% in administrative roles.
  

My Area of Excellence is Clinical Expertise and Innovation. In 2013, I began a Hypersomnia Clinic for pediatric patients with narcolepsy and related disorders, and this has become quite popular with patients and our trainees in sleep medicine. To educate and provide support for these patients, I have hosted an annual regional narcolepsy education meeting since 2013 for children with narcolepsy and their families. I also see patients with a variety of sleep disorders such as insomnia and sleep disordered breathing as well as patients with various neurological disorders with associated sleep problems.  Additionally, I read approximately 300 polysomnograms per year.

Much of my teaching takes place in clinic where I precept sleep fellows as well as rotating residents from psychiatry, general pediatrics and neurology. I teach sleep fellows and epilepsy fellows how to read polysomnograms 1-2 hours/week.  I give approximately 5 lectures per year to medical students, neurology residents, and epilepsy fellows on sleep physiology and sleep disorders. Within the Neurology Department, I have developed a quality improvement (QI) curriculum for child neurology residents, and I mentor 15 residents/year in the development, execution, and presentation of their QI projects. I have received grants from BCH to develop this QI curriculum and reported our QI curriculum in Pediatric Neurology. 

Administratively, I serve as the Associate Program Director for the Child Neurology Training Program at BCH and work on duty hour compliance, program development, and integration of QI education into the resident core curriculum. As Director of the sleep clerkship, I organize rotations in sleep medicine for students and residents. I also organize the teaching conferences, polysomnogram reading sessions, and continuity clinics at BCH for pediatric and adult sleep fellows in our clinical sleep fellowship. As the Director of sleep neurology clinics at BCH, I work closely with Administration, Finance, and Marketing to ensure we run efficient clinical services and continue to grow our patient base.

In the coming years, I will continue to develop my expertise in sleep medicine with a focus on improving the diagnosis and treatment of children with narcolepsy. My clinical acumen and research should enable me to develop better therapies and improve our understanding of narcolepsy and other neurologic sleep disorders.

CERTIFICATIONS

  • American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology, Child and Adolescent Neurology
  • American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology, Sleep Medicine

PUBLICATIONS

Publications powered by Harvard Catalyst Profiles

  1. Disrupted nighttime sleep and sleep instability in narcolepsy. J Clin Sleep Med. 2022 Jan 01; 18(1):289-304. View abstract
  2. Harlequin Syndrome, Apnea, and Acute on Chronic Hemiparesis: An Atypical Pediatric Case of Chiari I With Holocord Syringohydromyelia. Pediatr Neurol. 2022 01; 126:108-109. View abstract
  3. Remote Assessment of Pediatric Patients with Daytime Sleepiness and Healthy Controls: A Pilot Study of Feasibility and Reliability. Child Neurol Open. 2021 Jan-Dec; 8:2329048X211048064. View abstract
  4. Treatment of central disorders of hypersomnolence: an American Academy of Sleep Medicine clinical practice guideline. J Clin Sleep Med. 2021 09 01; 17(9):1881-1893. View abstract
  5. Treatment of central disorders of hypersomnolence: an American Academy of Sleep Medicine systematic review, meta-analysis, and GRADE assessment. J Clin Sleep Med. 2021 09 01; 17(9):1895-1945. View abstract
  6. Abnormal sleep physiology in children with 15q11.2-13.1 duplication (Dup15q) syndrome. Mol Autism. 2021 08 03; 12(1):54. View abstract
  7. Stability of nocturnal wake and sleep stages defines central nervous system disorders of hypersomnolence. Sleep. 2021 07 09; 44(7). View abstract
  8. Remote Assessment of Cognition in Kids and Adolescents with Daytime Sleepiness: A pilot study of feasibility and reliability. medRxiv. 2021 Mar 26. View abstract
  9. Defining disrupted nighttime sleep and assessing its diagnostic utility for pediatric narcolepsy type 1. Sleep. 2020 10 13; 43(10). View abstract
  10. To split or to lump? Classifying the central disorders of hypersomnolence. Sleep. 2020 08 12; 43(8). View abstract
  11. Expanded genetic insight and clinical experience of DNMT1-complex disorder. Neurol Genet. 2020 Aug; 6(4):e456. View abstract
  12. COMMENTARY on Lammers et al, Diagnosis of central disorders of hypersomnolence: Challenges in defining central disorders of hypersomnolence. Sleep Med Rev. 2020 08; 52:101327. View abstract
  13. Children with Narcolepsy type 1 have increased T-cell responses to orexins. Ann Clin Transl Neurol. 2019 12; 6(12):2566-2572. View abstract
  14. De novo ATP1A3 and compound heterozygous NLRP3 mutations in a child with autism spectrum disorder, episodic fatigue and somnolence, and muckle-wells syndrome. Mol Genet Metab Rep. 2018 Sep; 16:23-29. View abstract
  15. Nocturnal REM Sleep Without Atonia Is a Diagnostic Biomarker of Pediatric Narcolepsy. J Clin Sleep Med. 2018 02 15; 14(2):245-252. View abstract
  16. Pediatric Sleep Disorders. Continuum (Minneap Minn). 2018 02; 24(1, Child Neurology):210-227. View abstract
  17. Impaired memory consolidation in children with obstructive sleep disordered breathing. PLoS One. 2017; 12(11):e0186915. View abstract
  18. Non-Rapid Eye Movement Arousal Parasomnias in Children. Pediatr Ann. 2017 Sep 01; 46(9):e327-e331. View abstract
  19. Listening to the Patient Voice in Narcolepsy: Diagnostic Delay, Disease Burden, and Treatment Efficacy. J Clin Sleep Med. 2017 Mar 15; 13(3):419-425. View abstract
  20. Pediatric Sleep Duration Consensus Statement: A Step Forward. J Clin Sleep Med. 2016 12 15; 12(12):1705-1706. View abstract
  21. Consensus Statement of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine on the Recommended Amount of Sleep for Healthy Children: Methodology and Discussion. J Clin Sleep Med. 2016 11 15; 12(11):1549-1561. View abstract
  22. Corrigendum to "GJC2 promoter mutations causing Pelizaeus-Merzbacher-like disease" [Mol. Genet. Metab. 111 (2014) 393-398]. Mol Genet Metab. 2016 11; 119(3):293. View abstract
  23. Insomnia, parasomnias, and narcolepsy in children: clinical features, diagnosis, and management. Lancet Neurol. 2016 10; 15(11):1170-81. View abstract
  24. Recommended Amount of Sleep for Pediatric Populations: A Consensus Statement of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine. J Clin Sleep Med. 2016 06 15; 12(6):785-6. View abstract
  25. Sleep Dependent Memory Consolidation in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Sleep. 2015 Dec 01; 38(12):1955-63. View abstract
  26. Understanding Racial Differences in Narcolepsy Symptoms May Improve Diagnosis. Sleep. 2015 Nov 01; 38(11):1663-4. View abstract
  27. Usefulness of a Nocturnal SOREMP for Diagnosing Narcolepsy with Cataplexy in a Pediatric Population. Sleep. 2015 Jun 01; 38(6):859-65. View abstract
  28. Sleep-Dependent Memory Consolidation in Children. Semin Pediatr Neurol. 2015 Jun; 22(2):130-4. View abstract
  29. Quality measures for the care of patients with narcolepsy. J Clin Sleep Med. 2015 Mar 15; 11(3):335. View abstract
  30. Drug testing in children with excessive daytime sleepiness during multiple sleep latency testing. J Clin Sleep Med. 2014 Aug 15; 10(8):897-901. View abstract
  31. Increased pediatric functional neurological symptom disorders after the Boston marathon bombings: a case series. Pediatr Neurol. 2014 Nov; 51(5):619-23. View abstract
  32. Copy number variation plays an important role in clinical epilepsy. Ann Neurol. 2014 Jun; 75(6):943-58. View abstract
  33. Clinical reasoning: a 14-year-boy with spells of somnolence and cognitive changes. Neurology. 2014 Apr 22; 82(16):e142-6. View abstract
  34. Functional neurological symptom disorders in a pediatric emergency room: diagnostic accuracy, features, and outcome. Pediatr Neurol. 2014 Aug; 51(2):233-8. View abstract
  35. Development and implementation of a quality improvement curriculum for child neurology residents: lessons learned. Pediatr Neurol. 2014 May; 50(5):452-7. View abstract
  36. GJC2 promoter mutations causing Pelizaeus-Merzbacher-like disease. Mol Genet Metab. 2014 03; 111(3):393-398. View abstract
  37. Sleep deprivation and neurobehavioral functioning in children. Int J Psychophysiol. 2013 Aug; 89(2):259-64. View abstract
  38. Common neurological co-morbidities in autism spectrum disorders. Curr Opin Pediatr. 2011 Dec; 23(6):609-15. View abstract
  39. Intracranial artery dissection in an adolescent with Marfan syndrome. Pediatr Neurol. 2011 Jul; 45(1):39-41. View abstract
  40. New onset epilepsy in Prader-Willi syndrome: semiology and literature review. Pediatr Neurol. 2010 Oct; 43(4):297-9. View abstract
  41. Epilepsy in Prader-Willi syndrome: clinical characteristics and correlation to genotype. Epilepsy Behav. 2010 Nov; 19(3):306-10. View abstract
  42. Child neurology: past, present, and future: part 2: Present training structure. Neurology. 2010 Feb 09; 74(6):e17-9. View abstract
  43. Searching for marker of REM sleep behavior disorder: submentalis muscle EMG amplitude analysis during sleep in patients with narcolepsy/cataplexy. Sleep. 2009 Feb; 32(2):137. View abstract