Maitreyi Mazumdar MD MPH

Maitreyi Mazumdar, MD, MPH

Assistant in Neurology

Assistant Professor of Neurology, Harvard Medical School; Assistant Professor of Environmental Health, Harvard Medical School

  • Contact: 617-355-2758

  • Fax: 617-730-0285

"I believe that paying careful attention to the details of history provided by children and their families is the most important skill a neurologist can develop."

Medical Services

Specialties

  • Neurology
  • Epidemiology

Departments

  • Neurology

Languages

  • English
  • Hindi
  • Bengali
  • Mandarin Chinese
To schedule an appointment: Call 617-355-2758 or Request an Appointment
Maitreyi Mazumdar MD MPH

Why I entered medicine 

I observed that doctors often play an important role in a family’s life, often at a time that is particularly stressful for the family. I thought that as a doctor, I could use my own particular skills – my knowledge of science – to be a resource for families during difficult times.


Experience and Education

Education

Undergraduate

Yale University, 1991

New Haven, Connecticut

Graduate

M.P.H., Tufts University School of Medicine, 1997

Boston, Massachusetts

Medical School

Tufts University School of Medicine, 1997

Boston, Massachusetts

Graduate School

MSc,Epidemiology-Harvard School of Public Health, 2006

Boston, Massachusetts

Residency

Pediatric-New England Medical Center, 2000

Boston, Massachusetts

Chief Residency

Pediatrics-New England Medical Center, 2001

Boston, Massachusetts

Residency

Child Neurology Residency - Boston Children's Hospital , 2004

Boston, MA

Fellowship

Harvard Pediatric Health Services Research Fellowship, 2006

Boston, Massachusetts

Fellowship

Interdisciplinary Training Program in Neurotoxicology Research, Harvard School of Public Health, 2008

Boston, Massachusetts

Certifications

  • American Board of Neurology and Psychiatry: Neurology with Special Qualification in Child Neurology

  • American Board of Pediatrics

Professional History

My current research program studies the associations between environmental arsenic exposure and neural tube defects, a particular group of birth defects that involve the developing brain and spinal cord.  The study of neural tube defects provides a unique opportunity to learn about the complex interaction between environment, genes, and nutrition, and their combined effects on the developing nervous system. The long-range goals of my research program are 1) to develop novel screening strategies, appropriate for use in resource poor settings, to identify populations at high risk of neural tube defects, 2) to direct the development of more effective, mechanism-based preventive interventions for neural tube defects and 3) to test whether the biological pathways discovered linking nutrition, environmental hazards and neural tube defect risk are also involved in less severe neurodevelopmental disorders in children. Currently, this NIH-supported research takes place among infants and children in Bangladesh, a country grappling with the largest arsenic epidemic in world history.

Publications

Publications powered by Harvard Catalyst Profiles
  1. Rodrigues EG, Bellinger DC, Valeri L, Hasan MO, Quamruzzaman Q, Golam M, Kile ML, Christiani DC, Wright RO, Mazumdar M. Neurodevelopmental outcomes among 2- to 3-year-old children in Bangladesh with elevated blood lead and exposure to arsenic and manganese in drinking water. Environ Health. 2016; 15:44.
  2. Kile ML, Cardenas A, Rodrigues E, Mazumdar M, Dobson C, Golam M, Quamruzzaman Q, Rahman M, Christiani DC. Estimating Effects of Arsenic Exposure During Pregnancy on Perinatal Outcomes in a Bangladeshi Cohort. Epidemiology. 2016 Mar; 27(2):173-81.
  3. Mazumdar M, Valeri L, Rodrigues EG, Ibne Hasan MO, Hamid R, Paul L, Selhub J, Silva F, Mostofa MG, Quamruzzaman Q, Rahman M, Christiani DC. Polymorphisms in maternal folate pathway genes interact with arsenic in drinking water to influence risk of myelomeningocele. Birth Defects Res A Clin Mol Teratol. 2015 Sep; 103(9):754-62.
  4. Mazumdar M, Ibne Hasan MO, Hamid R, Valeri L, Paul L, Selhub J, Rodrigues EG, Silva F, Mia S, Mostofa MG, Quamruzzaman Q, Rahman M, Christiani DC. Arsenic is associated with reduced effect of folic acid in myelomeningocele prevention: a case control study in Bangladesh. Environ Health. 2015; 14:34.
  5. Mazumdar M, Christiani DC, Biswas SK, Ibne-Hasan OS, Kapur K, Hug C. Elevated sweat chloride levels due to arsenic toxicity. N Engl J Med. 2015 Feb 5; 372(6):582-4.
  6. Bobb JF, Valeri L, Claus Henn B, Christiani DC, Wright RO, Mazumdar M, Godleski JJ, Coull BA. Bayesian kernel machine regression for estimating the health effects of multi-pollutant mixtures. Biostatistics. 2015 Jul; 16(3):493-508.
  7. Gleason K, Shine JP, Shobnam N, Rokoff LB, Suchanda HS, Ibne Hasan MO, Mostofa G, Amarasiriwardena C, Quamruzzaman Q, Rahman M, Kile ML, Bellinger DC, Christiani DC, Wright RO, Mazumdar M. Contaminated turmeric is a potential source of lead exposure for children in rural Bangladesh. J Environ Public Health. 2014; 2014:730636.
  8. Bernson-Leung ME, Mazumdar M. Journal club: pretreatment EEG in childhood absence epilepsy. Neurology. 2014 May 6; 82(18):e158-60.
  9. Kile ML, Rodrigues EG, Mazumdar M, Dobson CB, Diao N, Golam M, Quamruzzaman Q, Rahman M, Christiani DC. A prospective cohort study of the association between drinking water arsenic exposure and self-reported maternal health symptoms during pregnancy in Bangladesh. Environ Health. 2014; 13(1):29.
  10. Mazumdar M, Xia W, Hofmann O, Gregas M, Ho Sui S, Hide W, Yang T, Needleman HL, Bellinger DC. Prenatal lead levels, plasma amyloid ß levels, and gene expression in young adulthood. Environ Health Perspect. 2012 May; 120(5):702-7.
  11. Show all
  12. Mazumdar M, Bellinger DC, Gregas M, Abanilla K, Bacic J, Needleman HL. Low-level environmental lead exposure in childhood and adult intellectual function: a follow-up study. Environ Health. 2011; 10:24.
  13. Mazumdar M. Risk of death is not increased in children with simple febrile seizures. J Pediatr. 2009 Jan; 154(1):150-1.
  14. Mazumdar M. Febrile seizures and risk of death. Lancet. 2008 Aug 9; 372(9637):429-30.
  15. Mazumdar M, Liu CY, Wang SF, Pan PC, Wu MT, Christiani DC. No association between parental or subject occupation and brain tumor risk. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2008 Jul; 17(7):1835-7.
  16. Mazumdar M, Heeney MM, Sox CM, Lieu TA. Preventing stroke among children with sickle cell anemia: an analysis of strategies that involve transcranial Doppler testing and chronic transfusion. Pediatrics. 2007 Oct; 120(4):e1107-16.
  17. Mazumdar M, Pandharipande P, Poduri A. Does albendazole affect seizure remission and computed tomography response in children with neurocysticercosis? A Systematic review and meta-analysis. J Child Neurol. 2007 Feb; 22(2):135-42.
  18. Anselm IA, Anselm IM, Alkuraya FS, Salomons GS, Jakobs C, Fulton AB, Mazumdar M, Rivkin M, Frye R, Poussaint TY, Marsden D. X-linked creatine transporter defect: a report on two unrelated boys with a severe clinical phenotype. J Inherit Metab Dis. 2006 Feb; 29(1):214-9.
  19. Mazumdar M, Rivkin, M. Creatine deficiency syndrome: A case of defective creatine transport presenting with episodic dystonia. Annals of Neurology. 2003; 54(Suppl. 7):S157.
To schedule an appointment: Call 617-355-2758 or Request an Appointment

Locations

We are grateful to have been ranked #1 on U.S. News & World Report's list of the best children's hospitals in the nation for the third year in a row, an honor we could not have achieved without the patients and families who inspire us to do our very best for them. Thanks to you, Boston Children's is a place where we can write the greatest children's stories ever told.”
- Sandra L. Fenwick, President and CEO

Boston Children's Hospital 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115 617-355-6000 | 800-355-7944

Close