Treatments for Non-Ossifying Fibroma in Children

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Traditional treatments for non-ossifying fibroma

These tumors, as a rule, resolve on their own, usually when the bones stop growing (called skeletal maturity). This tumor is only a problem if it causes a fracture while active. It rarely comes back.

Since this tumor is neither malignant, nor aggressive, the primary reason to treat it is to avoid a fracture, especially in athletic children. If a fracture exists or the tumor has weakened the bone, your child's doctor may want to operate. For fractures, the operation is put off until the fracture heals. Sometimes surgically placed metal rods and pins to fix a broken bone may be necessary.

The two types of procedures to treat a non-ossifying fibroma include:

Curettage and bone grafting

The most common form of treatment for an aneurysmal bone cyst. During this operation, the cyst is scraped out of the bone with a special instrument called a curette that has a scoop, loop or ring at its tip. The remaining cavity is then packed with donor bone tissue (allograft), bone chips taken from another bone (autograft), or other materials.

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