Treatments for Genetic Disorders in Children

LIke ThisLIke ThisLIke ThisLIke ThisLIke This

Contact the Division of Genetics and Genomics

Tying genetics to dyslexia allows us to identify a potential problem at birth, so that gives us the earliest possible chance to intervene. Doctors might make diagnoses using brain imaging, before reading even starts.

Christopher Walsh, MD, PhD, Boston Children's Chief of Genetics

Treatment of genetic disorders varies depending on the specific disease. In some cases, such as autism, the symptoms are treated with medication, behavioral and educational interventions. Other disorders, such as PKU (phenylketonuria) can be managed through diet while some of the physical symptoms of certain genetic diseases can be corrected with surgery. In many cases, your child will need ancillary services that may include speech therapy and occupational therapy, among others.

Whatever your child's diagnosis, a member of your child's genetic team will discuss treatment options with you and your family and make the appropriate referrals when necessary. We understand the kinds of challenges children and families with genetic disorders face and can connect you with outside resources for additional support.

We are grateful to have been ranked #1 on U.S. News & World Report's list of the best children's hospitals in the nation for the third year in a row, an honor we could not have achieved without the patients and families who inspire us to do our very best for them. Thanks to you, Boston Children's is a place where we can write the greatest children's stories ever told.”
- Sandra L. Fenwick, President and CEO

Boston Children's Hospital 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115 617-355-6000 | 800-355-7944

Close