Broken Femur (Thigh Bone) in Children

LIke ThisLIke ThisLIke ThisLIke ThisLIke This

Contact the Lower Extremity Program

  • 617-355-6021
  • International: +1-617-355-5209
  • Locations

What is a broken femur?

A broken femur (thigh bone) is a break in your child’s longest, largest, heaviest and strongest bone. The femur makes normal standing and walking possible. Although it’s a difficult bone to break, femur fractures in childhood are not uncommon.

Because of the femur’s great strength and size, fractures tend to occur only when the bone is hit with a very strong force. Femur fractures are serious injuries but most can heal without surgical treatment.

What differentiates the femur from the other bones in a child’s leg?

The leg extends from the pelvis to the knee (thigh) and from the knee to the ankle (lower leg). The leg has three long bones—the femur, tibia and fibula—as well as a fourth bone, the patella, also known as the kneecap. 

Lower extremity anatomy of the leg

We are grateful to have been ranked #1 on U.S. News & World Report's list of the best children's hospitals in the nation for the third year in a row, an honor we could not have achieved without the patients and families who inspire us to do our very best for them. Thanks to you, Boston Children's is a place where we can write the greatest children's stories ever told.”
- Sandra L. Fenwick, President and CEO

Boston Children's Hospital 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115 617-355-6000 | 800-355-7944