Pawprints

LIke ThisLIke ThisLIke ThisLIke ThisLIke This

Pawprints is Boston Children's Hospital dog visitation program. The Pawprints Program mission is to provide hospitalized children and their families a healthy diversion from the usual hospital routine and an opportunity for social interaction.

Special thanks to the Boston Children's League for their generosity in helping support Pawprints. Make a gift to further support this special program.

 

About Pawprints

Who can get a dog visit?

Hospitalized patients can get a dog visit if they meet certain criteria (known dog allergy, active asthma) and a visit is approved by both the patient's physician and the parent/guardian. Currently, the dogs may visit only specific inpatient areas.

What happens during a dog visit?

Some of our dogs visit patient's rooms and some of them visit the resource rooms on the floors. Once the visit is scheduled, the patient decides how he or she wants to interact with the dog. The dogs may sit on the floor, a chair, or on a clean sheet on the patient's bed. The patient may pet, play with, talk to, or watch the dog. Siblings and other family members are encouraged to interact with the therapy dogs as well. However, at no time may food be offered to any of the therapy dogs during a visit, since they are on the job! Before leaving for the day, every Pawprints dog is offered special treats by the hospital to say "thank you" for a job well done.

How long are the visits?

The length of each visit varies depending on the number of patients to be visited that day, the preferences of the patient, and any of the patient's healthcare needs (such as scheduled tests or procedures). Visits typically last between 5 and 10 minutes.

Who owns the dogs?

Boston Children's volunteers from the community own the dogs. The dogs live with their family and visit the hospital twice a month with their owner. The dogs do not live at the hospital.

Can my own dog visit?

Only dogs and volunteers who meet the hospital's requirements and have gone through the application process may visit. (Please note that these requirements do not apply to service dogs, which are allowed in the hospital.)

Can I get a visit from another kind of pet?

Boston Children's staff carefully reviewed available information to assure that the dog visits can occur in a hospital without increasing the chances of passing germs to patients. Unfortunately, this type of information is not currently available for other types of pets, which is why only dogs are allowed to visit with patients at this time.

Meet our Pawprints dogs!

Each Pawprints dog and handler makes their patient "rounds" at least twice a month. These "rounds" include visits with up to 10 patients, along with visiting parents, siblings, friends and Boston Children's Hospital staff. If the child requests, the dog may make a "bed visit" (the dog lays on a clean sheet on the bed) so the child may easily pet the dog. Visits typically occur in patient rooms, although some visits occur in activity rooms on the floor.

 

       Karma 2014

My name is Indy, short for Indiana Jones! I am a Cavalier King Charles Spaniel. I love long ear scratches, even longer cuddles, making new friends, walks on the beach and action adventure movies!

  

                                                               

My name is Karma. I am a Golden Doodle. My mom is a Standard Poodle and my Dad  is a Golden Retriever. I like to be scratched and petted. I also like to chew on stuffed animals and take walks in the park

                            

 

                       

   Cody in the Snow

 

My name is Spankey. I am a Newfoundland mix. I love swimming, sleeping in the bathtub, going to doggie daycare, playing in the snow, & playing with my best friend Dudley. I love having my ears rubbed! Sometimes I forget I'm so big and will try to sit on your lap, but don't worry because I am truly a "gentle giant."

 

My name is Cody. I am a Cavalier King Charles Spaniel and I was born in December 2010. I enjoy riding in old trucks, playing fetch and chasing squirrels, but most of  all I love being the center of attention.! Meeting people    and making new friends is always fun, but watch out because I tend to give      sloppy kisses!!

 

      

              

 

         

 

My name is Phil. I am a Pug mix. I live with my mom and enjoy going to the park. I love to have my ears and neck rubbed. I can dance and jump through hoops.

 

My name is Dunkin. I am half   Shih Tzu and half Bijon. I was   born in Colorado. Dingos are   my favorite treat and my   favorite food is cheese. I really enjoy having my belly rubbed and watching the Animal  Planet. I was named after Dunkin Donuts, but I've     never tried coffee or donuts!
              Kennedy

 

 

My name is Vega and I’m a Shetland Sheepdog. I love to chase squirrels although I never catch them. I love to hike in the woods or run on the beach chasing seagulls. I’m really good at retrieving and can catch a frisbee in the air. My best friends are my family's four cats. People tell me that my fur is very soft.

 

 

My name is Kennedy. I'm a Great Pyrenees. I was born in North Carolina and was   adopted by my "furever"    family that includes my brother Duffy, also a Great Pyrenees, and our two house cats, Linus and Murphy.   I LOVE the snow, hiking    through the woods and the beach.
       Mozart
        Norbert

 

 My name is Mozart. I am an Australian Labradoodle. I was born on 11/3/2006 to Labradoodle parents. I was bred in Hudson New York and came to live with my mom when I was only about four months of age.

 

My name is Norbert. I may    be a tiny 3 lb. dog, but I     have a HUGE heart. I am a super-smart mixed breed      pup made up of: Carn Terrier, Chihuahua and Lhasa Apso.      I like to walk in the grass,     sleep on people's laps, and make everyone around me   smile.
     Gracie      Dayton

 

My name is Gracie. I am a 2 year old Australian Shepherd. I am supposed to be a herding dog, but the only think I get to herd at home are squirrels! I don't have a tail. So when I am happy I wiggle my whole rear end.

 

My name is Dayton. I am a Muttle (1/2 lab, 1/4 golden,    1/4 poodle) My nickname is    The Dude. I love to go to     work each day with my   hunman, Beth. At work I     have a big fan club & my own office where I get lots of  visitors. Last summer I finally learned to swim. I'm not very good, so I have to wear my swimmies all the time. Still,         I am very proud I finally learned!
    
   
 

                                              

Become a volunteer!                  Sarah and Herman in Garden

 

Thank you for your interest in volunteering for the Pawprints Dog Visitation Program. Please review the volunteer guide, as well as the information below about our requirements and application process.

If you/your dog meet our requirements and are interested in being placed on the Pawprints volunteer waitlist, please fill out the waitlist request form. Waitlist status is not strictly first-come, first-served. Dog/Handler teams are chosen based on how well they match the program's needs (dog breed, dog size, time available, etc.).

Pawprints_App_WaitlistForm

As volunteer opportunities become available, the Pawprints program coordinators will invite waitlisted teams who match the program's needs to complete a full application.

If you have any questions about the Pawprints Dog Visitation Program requirements or application process, please contact

Lynn Belkin, Pawprints Program Coordinator at 617-355-6743 or lynn.belkin@childrens.harvard.edu.

APPLICATION PROCESS

Please note: The Pawprints Application Process can take up to 6 months to complete. Failure to pass or complete any requirement in the application and orientation process will result in the application being denied.

  • Review the volunteer guide and program requirements.
  • Submit a waitlist request form.
  • When invited, complete a full application (includes Canine Application, Canine Health Assessment Form, Pawprints Volunteer Application, two letters of reference, a copy of the dog's therapy dog registration, and a photo of the dog). Submit completed application in person with your dog. Each application will be reviewed by the program coordinator and program veterinarian.
  • Canine/Handler team must pass a behavioral evaluation.
  • Canine laboratory screening (throat and fecal culture)
  • Hospital Volunteer Orientation (including criminal background check, tuberculosis and immunization screening)

Pawprints Volunteer Orientation (including shadow visit of another team without your dog, orientation visit with your dog, and up to three observed patient visits with your dog)


HANDLER APPLICANT REQUIREMENTS

  • Be at least 18 years old (due to the multiple demands of handling a dog and interacting with patients and families)

  • Be willing to become a hospital volunteer (includes personal interview, criminal background check, review of immunizations, tuberculosis screening, and annual flu shot).

  • Agree to undergo the handler and canine screening process

  • Be willing to commit to two visits per month for a minimum of one year

  • Agree to adhere to all requirements and guidelines of the Boston Children's Hospital Pawprints Dog Visitation Program. This includes agreeing to bathe and groom the dog within 24 hours of each visit.

  • Handlers must have an ability to work in a busy, complex hospital environment, be team-oriented and have strong communication skills. Volunteering in the Pawprints Program is emotionally complex and requires an ability to separate one's own needs from those of the patients and families. The handler must learn to establish caring relationships while maintaining clear boundaries. *Please note: This is particularly challenging when the handler is a medically trained staff person or has some prior working relationship with staff (i.e., parent of a child who has received or is currently receiving care at Children's). During the volunteer period, the handler must limit interactions with Children's staff, patients, and families to handler duties as defined by the Pawprints Program.

Canine Applicant Requirements

  • Dog's age: 2 years or older

  • Ownership of dog: The dog must be owned by the handler who will be responsible for meeting all Pawprints guidelines and who will participate in the visits with the dog.

  • Registration with a therapy dog organization (See Therapy Dog Links for more information.)

CANINE HEALTH REQUIREMENTS

  • Be in good physical health (as determined by a licensed veterinarian) and be vaccinated against rabies and DHPP (distemper, hepatitis, parvovirus, parainfluenza)

  • Have an annual fecal and heartworm check

  • Be on year-round heartworm preventive

  • Be on year-round flea/tick prevention program

CANINE TEMPERAMENT

  • Mellow, calm and gentle in a variety of environments

  • Able to reliably respond to basic obedience commands (sit, down, come, stay)

  • Enjoys spending time with all types of people and being petted

Pawprints Program - Considerations Before You Apply

Participation in Pawprints involves a significant investment of time and effort on the part of all involved - volunteers, therapy dog evaluators, and Children's staff. We believe, however, that the potential benefits and joy that dog visitation may offer to the children and their families are well worth the effort by staff and participating dog owners. When considering whether to apply, please carefully review the Pawprints Volunteer Guide and the Volunteer Services guidelines and then carefully consider the following issues.

Commitment

Time commitments include Pawprints screening, orientation, dog preparation time (grooming bathing, etc.), travel, and patient visits. All Pawprints volunteers are asked to commit to two visits per month for a minimum of one year. Pawprints Program commitments include following all Pawprints guidelines and requirements, such as behavioral and laboratory screening and primary canine health care. After reviewing all of the materials, ask yourself if you can commit to Pawprints without undue burden on your resources and schedule.

Service to others

Due to the serious nature of the conditions of the children we care for, volunteering at Boston Children's Hospital is emotionally complex. It is especially important for Pawprints volunteers to be able to deal effectively with an emotionally complex environment since the owner's stress may cause the dog to become stressed. Successful volunteers are motivated to help children and families within the framework of their role; they have an ability to separate their own needs from those of the patients and families because their primary goal is to serve others. Spend time considering your motivation for volunteering and how realistic your goals are.

Dog socialization

A therapy dog must feel comfortable and be confident in a variety of environments and situations, and not just at home or at a favorite dog spot. For a dog to be well socialized, he/she must be taken to many places in order to have the opportunity to learn. A successful therapy dog typically has had many experiences outside his/her home environment. To determine if your dog is well socialized, review your dog's history of going to new places along with his/her reactions.

Dog temperament

A therapy dog must have a stable, steady temperament regardless of the circumstances. Pawprints dogs must maintain a strong motivation to visit even with individuals who may inadvertently handle them roughly because of their disabilities. Pawprints dogs must be comfortable with people of all ages, from toddlers to the elderly, all ethnicities, and all abilities (e.g. wheelchair uses, blind, deaf).

Control over dog

Therapy dogs must be easily under their owners' control at all times. They  must demonstrate impeccable visiting manners - there must be no barking, jumping up, or hard tugging on leashes. Pawprints dogs must respond willingly to commands given by their owners regardless of the circumstances.

Teamwork

Since both the dog and the owner have tasks to perform during a visit, they must be able to work as a team in order for the visit to smoothly. Teamwork extends beyond basic obedience commands - it includes your relationship, your communication with each other, and how you treat your dog as a partner with his/her own needs and preferences.

Therapy Dog Links

Are you interested in learning more about therapy dogs? Visit these websites or check out the books listed for more information.

  • Delta Society is a well-known therapy dog registry.

  • Therapy Dogs International, Inc is a well-known therapy dog registry.

  • Therapy Dogs Incorporated is a well-known therapy dog registry.

  • The Charles River Dog Training Club Web site lists information on CGC tests and Therapy Dog International tests (a national therapy dog registry) that are scheduled for the greater Boston area. (All canine Pawprints applicants must have a CGC certificate or registration with a therapy dog organization).

  • Caring Canines Visiting Therapy Dogs, Inc. is a non-profit therapy dog visitation program that schedules visits to facilities in the towns north and northwest of Boston. These are group visits with multiple therapy dogs and their handlers in attendance. Caring Canines provided consultative services for the Pawprints Dog Visitation Program.

  • Dog B.O.N.E.S. is a non-profit therapy dog corporation serving all of Massachusetts. This group's activities include matching facilities with certified therapy dog teams and offering therapy dog classes.

  • Wanted! Animal Volunteers by Mary R. Burch provides an excellent overview of volunteering with your pet in a variety of settings. This book was published in 2002 and should be available at bookstores or on-line.

  • Therapy Dogs Today: Their Gifts, Our Obligation by Kris Butler "explores complex professional and ethical issues that surround the environments in which therapy dogs do their jobs." This book was published in 2004 and should be available on-line.

Request an Appointment

If this is a medical emergency, please dial 9-1-1. This form should not be used in an emergency.

Patient Information
Date of Birth:
Contact Information
Appointment Details
Send RequestIf you do not see the specialty you are looking for, please call us at: 617-355-6000.International visitors should call International Health Services at +1-617-355-5209.
Please complete all required fields

This department is currently not accepting appointment requests online. Please call us at: 617-355-6000. International +1-617-355-6000.

This department is currently not accepting appointment requests online. Please call us at: 617-355-6000. International +1-617-355-6000.

Thank you.

Your request has been successfully submitted

You will be contacted within 1 business day.

If you have questions or would like more information, please call:

617-355-6000 +1-617-355-6000
close
Find a Doctor
Search by Clinician's Last Name or Specialty:
Select by Location:
Search by First Letter of Clinician's Last Name: *ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ
More optionsSearch
Condition & Treatments
Search for a Condition or Treatment:
Show Items Starting With: *ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ
View allSearch
Visitor Information
The future of pediatrics will be forged by thinking differently, breaking paradigms and joining together in a shared vision of tackling the toughest challenges before us.”
- Sandra L. Fenwick, President and CEO
Close