Conditions + Treatments

Metatarsus Adductus in Children

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What is Metatarsus adductus?

Metatarsus adductus, also known as metatarsus varus, is a common foot deformity noted at birth that causes the front half of the foot, or forefoot, to turn inward.

•   May be "flexible" (the foot can be straightened to a degree by hand) or
    "non-flexible" (the foot cannot be straightened by hand).
•   Occurs in about one of every 1,000-2,000 live births.
•   Babies with metatarsus adductus are at an increased risk for
    developmental dysplasia of the hip.

Boston Children's approach to metatarsus adductus

Metatarsus adductus is a common problem that can be corrected. Regardless of how much the forefoot turns inward, starting treatment immediately after birth improves your child's prognosis. But babies born with metatarsus adductus rarely need treatment since this condition often corrects itself as the baby grows. At Children's, your child's doctor may give you tips on how to ease this process along naturally. Doctors at Children's would recommend surgery for only the most severe cases of metatarsus adductus.

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- Sandra L. Fenwick, President and CEO

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