Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis in Children

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Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare disorder that occurs when your child has too many of a certain type of white blood cell.

  • The white blood cell affected is called a Langerhans cell (it was named for a German scientist).
  • These cells normally reside in the skin and help fight infections and destroy certain foreign substances in the body.
  • In LCH, these cells accumulate on bones and other parts of the body, particularly the head and neck, causing a wide range of problems.
  • LCH can also be found in the ribs, sternum, long bones of the arms and legs, vertebra of the spine and the pelvis.
  • Although LCH can occur in people of all ages, a majority of cases occur in children who are under 10 years old.

Individualized care, new treatments

Through Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center, a 50-year partnership between Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Boston Children's Hospital, patients with LCH receive individualized care to treat every aspect of this condition from an expert team of specialists. Patients also benefit from a team of researchers striving to understand the scientific causes of Langerhans cell histiocytosis, which results in continual introduction of new treatment options.

We are grateful to have been ranked #1 on U.S. News & World Report's list of the best children's hospitals in the nation for the third year in a row, an honor we could not have achieved without the patients and families who inspire us to do our very best for them. Thanks to you, Boston Children's is a place where we can write the greatest children's stories ever told.”
- Sandra L. Fenwick, President and CEO

Boston Children's Hospital 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115 617-355-6000 | 800-355-7944

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