Capillary malformation in Children

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Contact the Vascular Anomalies Center

When you saw that your baby had a birthmark, you may have been concerned. But rest assured that birthmarks are very common in infants—and most of them are pretty harmless. A capillary malformation—sometimes called a "port-wine stain"—is a flat, red-pink stain on your child's skin that is present at birth.

  • It’s caused by dilated capillaries in the skin that enlarge and darken as your child grows older.
  • It’s mostly a cosmetic problem that often doesn’t need any treatment at all.
  • If it doesn’t go away, and is in a prominent location, you may want to consider laser therapy for your child.

If your doctor told you that your child’s birthmark was called a capillary malformation, you probably have many questions:

  • What is a capillary malformation?
  • Will it go away?
  • How is it treated?
  • What does it mean for my child?

At Children’s Hospital Boston, we’ve got answers for you.

How Children’s Hospital Boston approaches capillary malformations

Should we need to treat your child, you’re in the right place. Children’s is home to the world’s largest and most experienced Vascular Anomalies Center.

When doctors anywhere in the world have questions about a child’s birthmark and how to treat it, they often call us.

Our doctors have helped many kids with capillary malformations—which means that if your child needs treatment he will be cared for by some of the world’s most experienced physicians.

The future of pediatrics will be forged by thinking differently, breaking paradigms and joining together in a shared vision of tackling the toughest challenges before us.”
- Sandra L. Fenwick, President and CEO

Boston Children's Hospital 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115 617-355-6000 | 800-355-7944