Anaphylaxis

What is anaphylaxis?

Also called anaphylactic shock, anaphylaxis is a dangerous reaction to an allergen, or an item that your child is allergic to. In most cases, anaphylaxis is a medical emergency. Anaphylaxis can occur anywhere from seconds to an hour after your child’s exposure to an allergen.

If your child is in anaphylactic shock, call 911 right away. 

What are the symptoms of anaphylactic shock?

It’s important to remember that each child may experience symptoms differently. However, the most common symptoms of anaphylaxis are:

  • tightness or swelling of the throat
  • severe itching of the skin
  • nausea and vomiting
  • stomach pain
  • heart failure
  • irregular heart beats
  • lowered blood pressure

How is anaphylaxis treated?

At the hospital, your child's doctor will probably be treated with an injection of epinephrine, which will help stop the severe effects caused by the allergen. As a follow up, the physician may instruct you on the use of an emergency allergy kit that contains epinephrine to have near your child in case of future episodes.