ABOUT THE RESEARCHER

BACKGROUND

Dr. Elissa Weitzman is Associate Professor of Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School and Associate Scientist based in Adolescent/Young Adult Medicine and the Computational Health Informatics Program at Boston Children’s Hospital. Her graduate training at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health was in health policy, behavioral sciences, psychiatric and social epidemiology and she completed post-doctoral training in medical ethics and public health in psychiatry at the Harvard Medical School. Her investigations use a multidisciplinary and mixed methods approach grounded in a biopsychosocial model of disease to advance understanding, prevention and care of youth at risk from chronic illness and/or substance use.

PUBLICATIONS

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  1. Marijuana Use to Address Symptoms and Side Effects by Youth With Chronic Medical Conditions. Pediatrics. 2021 Mar; 147(3). View abstract
  2. Safety Protocols for Adolescent Substance Use Research in Clinical Settings. J Adolesc Health. 2020 Sep 26. View abstract
  3. Sensitivity and specificity of S2BI for identifying alcohol and cannabis use disorders among adolescents presenting for primary care. Subst Abus. 2020 Aug 19; 1-8. View abstract
  4. Digital Health Technology to Enhance Adolescent and Young Adult Clinical Preventive Services: Affordances and Challenges. J Adolesc Health. 2020 08; 67(2S):S24-S33. View abstract
  5. Alcohol Use Behaviors and Reasons to Abstain From or Limit Drinking Among Medically Vulnerable Youth. J Addict Med. 2020 Jul/Aug; 14(4):311-318. View abstract
  6. Parental Perceptions About Alcohol Use for Their Adolescent with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder. J Dev Behav Pediatr. 2020 Jun/Jul; 41(5):366-372. View abstract
  7. Co-occurring Substance Use Disorders in Youth With Chronic Medical Conditions: The Need for Integration of Addiction Treatment into Mainstream Medical Facilities. J Addict Med. 2020 May/Jun; 14(3):261-263. View abstract
  8. Student Experience of School Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment. J Sch Health. 2020 06; 90(6):431-438. View abstract
  9. Online Searching and Social Media to Detect Alcohol Use Risk at Population Scale. Am J Prev Med. 2020 01; 58(1):79-88. View abstract
  10. Response to the Letter to the Editor From Mayen et al Regarding "Clinical Trial Recruitment and Retention of College Students With Type 1 Diabetes via Social Media: An Implementation Case Study". J Diabetes Sci Technol. 2020 01; 14(1):187-188. View abstract
  11. Rising Prevalence of Comorbid Alcohol and Opioid Use Disorders in Adolescents and Young Adults in the United States. J Gen Intern Med. 2019 10; 34(10):1987-1989. View abstract
  12. Depressive Symptoms and Suicidality in Adolescents Using e-Cigarettes and Marijuana: A Secondary Data Analysis From the Youth Risk Behavior Survey. J Addict Med. 2019 Sep/Oct; 13(5):362-365. View abstract
  13. Moving beyond perceived riskiness: Marijuana-related beliefs and marijuana use in adolescents. Subst Abus. 2020; 41(3):297-300. View abstract
  14. Screening and Counseling for Alcohol Use in Adolescents With Chronic Medical Conditions in the Ambulatory Setting. J Adolesc Health. 2019 06; 64(6):804-806. View abstract
  15. Clinical Trial Recruitment and Retention of College Students with Type 1 Diabetes via Social Media: An Implementation Case Study. J Diabetes Sci Technol. 2019 05; 13(3):445-456. View abstract
  16. Gaps in Mental Health Care for Youth With Rheumatologic Conditions: A Mixed Methods Study of Perspectives From Behavioral Health Providers. Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken). 2019 05; 71(5):591-601. View abstract
  17. Parental views on state cannabis laws and marijuana use for their medically vulnerable children. Drug Alcohol Depend. 2019 06 01; 199:59-67. View abstract
  18. Acute Mental Health Symptoms in Adolescent Marijuana Users. JAMA Pediatr. 2019 02 01; 173(2):185-186. View abstract
  19. Perspectives on substance use among youth with chronic medical conditions and implications for clinical guidance and prevention: A qualitative study. PLoS One. 2019; 14(1):e0209963. View abstract
  20. How Returning Aggregate Research Results Impacts Interest in Research Engagement and Planned Actions Relevant to Health Care Decision Making: Cohort Study. J Med Internet Res. 2018 12 21; 20(12):e10647. View abstract
  21. Alcohol Use and Alcohol-Interactive Medications Among Medically Vulnerable Youth. Pediatrics. 2018 10; 142(4). View abstract
  22. Enhancing Autonomy in Biobank Decisions: Too Much of a Good Thing? J Empir Res Hum Res Ethics. 2018 04; 13(2):125-138. View abstract
  23. Facing Addiction: A Laudable, but Incomplete Effort. Am J Public Health. 2018 Feb; 108(2):153-155. View abstract
  24. Adding patient-reported outcomes to a multisite registry to quantify quality of life and experiences of disease and treatment for youth with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. J Patient Rep Outcomes. 2018; 2. View abstract
  25. Expectancy and Achievement Gaps in Educational Attainment and Subsequent Adverse Health Effects Among Adolescents With and Without Chronic Medical Conditions. J Adolesc Health. 2017 Oct; 61(4):461-470. View abstract
  26. Substance Use Among Adolescents with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: Reasons for Use, Knowledge of Risks, and Provider Messaging/Education. J Dev Behav Pediatr. 2017 Jul/Aug; 38(6):417-423. View abstract
  27. Preferences for the Return of Individual Results From Research on Pediatric Biobank Samples. J Empir Res Hum Res Ethics. 2017 04; 12(2):97-106. View abstract
  28. Assessing Behavioral Stages From Social Media Data. CSCW Conf Comput Support Coop Work. 2017 Feb-Mar; 2017:1320-1333. View abstract
  29. Screening and brief intervention in high schools: School nurses' practices and attitudes in Massachusetts. Subst Abus. 2017 Jul-Sep; 38(3):257-260. View abstract
  30. Denominator Issues for Personally Generated Data in Population Health Monitoring. Am J Prev Med. 2017 04; 52(4):549-553. View abstract
  31. Research on Clinical Preventive Services for Adolescents and Young Adults: Where Are We and Where Do We Need to Go? J Adolesc Health. 2017 Mar; 60(3):249-260. View abstract
  32. A Screening Tool for Assessing Alcohol Use Risk among Medically Vulnerable Youth. PLoS One. 2016; 11(5):e0156240. View abstract
  33. Family health history reporting is sensitive to small changes in wording. Genet Med. 2016 12; 18(12):1308-1311. View abstract
  34. Innovations in health information technologies for chronic pulmonary diseases. Respir Res. 2016 Apr 05; 17:38. View abstract
  35. Substance Use Patterns Through Early Adulthood: Results for Youth With and Without Chronic Conditions. Am J Prev Med. 2016 07; 51(1):33-45. View abstract
  36. Using Patient-Reported Outcome Measures to Capture the Patient's Voice in Research and Care of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis. Rheum Dis Clin North Am. 2016 05; 42(2):333-46. View abstract
  37. Building a Learning Marijuana Surveillance System. JAMA Pediatr. 2016 Mar; 170(3):193-4. View abstract
  38. Participant Satisfaction With a Preference-Setting Tool for the Return of Individual Research Results in Pediatric Genomic Research. J Empir Res Hum Res Ethics. 2015 Oct; 10(4):414-26. View abstract
  39. Alcohol and Marijuana Use and Treatment Nonadherence Among Medically Vulnerable Youth. Pediatrics. 2015 Sep; 136(3):450-7. View abstract
  40. Alcohol and Marijuana Use and Treatment Nonadherence Among Medically Vulnerable Youth. Pediatrics. 2015 Aug 31. View abstract
  41. The development of a preference-setting model for the return of individual genomic research results. J Empir Res Hum Res Ethics. 2015 Apr; 10(2):107-20. View abstract
  42. College health service capacity to support youth with chronic medical conditions. Pediatrics. 2014 Nov; 134(5):885-91. View abstract
  43. Averting the perfect storm: addressing youth substance use risk from social media use. Pediatr Ann. 2014 Oct; 43(10):411. View abstract
  44. Coping with college and inflammatory bowel disease: implications for clinical guidance and support. Inflamm Bowel Dis. 2014 Sep; 20(9):1618-27. View abstract
  45. Ready, set, stop: mismatch between self-care beliefs, transition readiness skills, and transition planning among adolescents, young adults, and parents. Clin Pediatr (Phila). 2014 Oct; 53(11):1062-8. View abstract
  46. Parents' preferences for return of results in pediatric genomic research. Public Health Genomics. 2014; 17(2):105-14. View abstract
  47. Innovative uses of electronic health records and social media for public health surveillance. Curr Diab Rep. 2014 Mar; 14(3):468. View abstract
  48. Participatory surveillance of diabetes device safety: a social media-based complement to traditional FDA reporting. J Am Med Inform Assoc. 2014 Jul-Aug; 21(4):687-91. View abstract
  49. Advancing healthcare transitions in the medical home: tools for providers, families and adolescents with special healthcare needs. Curr Opin Pediatr. 2013 Aug; 25(4):439-46. View abstract
  50. Participatory surveillance of hypoglycemia and harms in an online social network. JAMA Intern Med. 2013 Mar 11; 173(5):345-51. View abstract
  51. Willingness to share personal health record data for care improvement and public health: a survey of experienced personal health record users. BMC Med Inform Decis Mak. 2012 May 22; 12:39. View abstract
  52. Surveillance of an Online Social Network to Assess Population-level Diabetes Health Status and Healthcare Quality. Online J Public Health Inform. 2011; 3(3). View abstract
  53. Sharing data for public health research by members of an international online diabetes social network. PLoS One. 2011 Apr 27; 6(4):e19256. View abstract
  54. Social but safe? Quality and safety of diabetes-related online social networks. J Am Med Inform Assoc. 2011 May 01; 18(3):292-7. View abstract
  55. Helping high-risk youth move through high-risk periods: personally controlled health records for improving social and health care transitions. J Diabetes Sci Technol. 2011 Jan 01; 5(1):47-54. View abstract
  56. Sharing medical data for health research: the early personal health record experience. J Med Internet Res. 2010 May 25; 12(2):e14. View abstract
  57. Persistence of heavy drinking and ensuing consequences at heavy drinking colleges. J Stud Alcohol Drugs. 2009 Sep; 70(5):726-34. View abstract
  58. Magnitude of and trends in alcohol-related mortality and morbidity among U.S. college students ages 18-24, 1998-2005. J Stud Alcohol Drugs Suppl. 2009 Jul; (16):12-20. View abstract
  59. Acceptability of a personally controlled health record in a community-based setting: implications for policy and design. J Med Internet Res. 2009 Apr 29; 11(2):e14. View abstract
  60. Comparing web and mail responses in a mixed mode survey in college alcohol use research. Addict Behav. 2006 Sep; 31(9):1619-27. View abstract
  61. The effect of a campus-community environmental alcohol prevention initiative on student drinking and driving: results from the "a matter of degree" program evaluation. Traffic Inj Prev. 2005 Dec; 6(4):323-30. View abstract
  62. Youth smoking risk and community patterns of alcohol availability and control: a national multilevel study. J Epidemiol Community Health. 2005 Dec; 59(12):1065-71. View abstract
  63. The co-occurrence of smoking and drinking among young adults in college: national survey results from the United States. Drug Alcohol Depend. 2005 Dec 12; 80(3):377-86. View abstract
  64. Risk modifying effect of social capital on measures of heavy alcohol consumption, alcohol abuse, harms, and secondhand effects: national survey findings. J Epidemiol Community Health. 2005 Apr; 59(4):303-9. View abstract
  65. Depressive symptoms, DSM-IV alcohol abuse and their comorbidity among children of problem drinkers in a national survey: effects of parent and child gender and parent recovery status. J Stud Alcohol. 2005 Jan; 66(1):66-73. View abstract
  66. Reducing drinking and related harms in college: evaluation of the "A Matter of Degree" program. Am J Prev Med. 2004 Oct; 27(3):187-96. View abstract
  67. Poor mental health, depression, and associations with alcohol consumption, harm, and abuse in a national sample of young adults in college. J Nerv Ment Dis. 2004 Apr; 192(4):269-77. View abstract
  68. College student binge drinking and the "prevention paradox": implications for prevention and harm reduction. J Drug Educ. 2004; 34(3):247-65. View abstract
  69. The relationship of alcohol outlet density to heavy and frequent drinking and drinking-related problems among college students at eight universities. Health Place. 2003 Mar; 9(1):1-6. View abstract
  70. Taking up binge drinking in college: the influences of person, social group, and environment. J Adolesc Health. 2003 Jan; 32(1):26-35. View abstract
  71. Alcohol abuse and dependence among U.S. college students. J Stud Alcohol. 2002 May; 63(3):263-70. View abstract
  72. Risk and reluctance: understanding impediments to colorectal cancer screening. Prev Med. 2001 Jun; 32(6):502-13. View abstract
  73. Giving means receiving: the protective effect of social capital on binge drinking on college campuses. Am J Public Health. 2000 Dec; 90(12):1936-9. View abstract
  74. Patient delay in seeking care for heart attack symptoms: findings from focus groups conducted in five U.S. regions. Prev Med. 2000 Sep; 31(3):205-13. View abstract
  75. What colleges are doing about student binge drinking. A survey of college administrators. J Am Coll Health. 2000 Mar; 48(5):219-26. View abstract
  76. Alcohol use, abuse, and related problems among children of problem drinkers: findings from a national survey of college alcohol use. J Nerv Ment Dis. 2000 Mar; 188(3):148-54. View abstract
  77. Effects of lexical intervention on the phonology of late talkers. J Speech Lang Hear Res. 1997 Apr; 40(2):338-48. View abstract
  78. Community solutions to community problems--preventing adolescent alcohol use. Am J Public Health. 1996 Jul; 86(7):923-5. View abstract
  79. "Drugs and AIDS--reaching for help": a videotape on AIDS and drug abuse prevention for criminal justice populations. J Drug Educ. 1994; 24(1):1-20. View abstract