ABOUT THE RESEARCHER

BACKGROUND

Dr. Maimuna (Maia) Majumder is a computational epidemiologist specializing in emerging epidemics and a recent graduate of the Engineering Systems program at MIT’s Institute for Data, Systems, and Society (IDSS). In between her graduate studies and her current position at CHIP, Maia spent a year at the Health Policy Data Science lab at Harvard Medical School’s Health Care Policy department as a postdoctoral fellow. During her masters and doctoral studies at MIT, she was funded through a graduate fellowship at HealthMap. Prior to Maia’s arrival at MIT, she earned a Bachelors of Science in Engineering Science (with a concentration in Civil and Environmental Engineering) and a Masters of Public Health in Epidemiology and Biostatistics at Tufts University. While at Tufts, Maia was a field researcher with the International Centre for Diarrheal Disease Research, Bangladesh (ICDDR,B), where she worked with clinic patients (and their data) to learn how to better tell their stories. Her current research interests involve probabilistic modeling, artificial intelligence, and “systems epidemiology” in the context of public health, with a focus on causal inference for infectious disease surveillance using digital disease data (e.g. search trends; news and social media). She also enjoys exploring novel techniques for data procurement, writing about data for the general public, and creating meaningful data visualizations. As of January 2019, Maia has been engaged in pandemic response efforts and is a leading expert in COVID-19 epidemiology. [WIKI]

PUBLICATIONS

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  1. A generalizable data assembly algorithm for infectious disease outbreaks. JAMIA Open. 2021 Jul; 4(3):ooab058. View abstract
  2. Risk factors for increased COVID-19 case-fatality in the United States: A county-level analysis during the first wave. medRxiv. 2021 Feb 26. View abstract
  3. Analyzing Digital Evidence From a Telemental Health Platform to Assess Complex Psychological Responses to the COVID-19 Pandemic: Content Analysis of Text Messages. JMIR Form Res. 2021 Feb 09; 5(2):e26190. View abstract
  4. Tracking COVID-19 using online search. NPJ Digit Med. 2021 Feb 08; 4(1):17. View abstract
  5. Gender disparities in coronavirus disease 2019 clinical trial leadership. Clin Microbiol Infect. 2021 Jul; 27(7):1007-1010. View abstract
  6. What Is Herd Immunity? JAMA. 2020 11 24; 324(20):2113. View abstract
  7. The UK needs a sustainable strategy for COVID-19. Lancet. 2020 12 05; 396(10265):1800-1801. View abstract
  8. The role of environmental factors on transmission rates of the COVID-19 outbreak: an initial assessment in two spatial scales. Sci Rep. 2020 10 12; 10(1):17002. View abstract
  9. Evaluating interest in off-label use of disinfectants for COVID-19. Lancet Digit Health. 2020 11; 2(11):e564-e566. View abstract
  10. Modeling between-population variation in COVID-19 dynamics in Hubei, Lombardy, and New York City. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2020 10 13; 117(41):25904-25910. View abstract
  11. Machine Learning Maps Research Needs in COVID-19 Literature. Patterns (N Y). 2020 Dec 11; 1(9):100123. View abstract
  12. Real-time estimation of disease activity in emerging outbreaks using internet search information. PLoS Comput Biol. 2020 08; 16(8):e1008117. View abstract
  13. Tuberculosis and foreign-born populations in the United States: A mixed methods pilot study of media reporting and political identification. PLoS One. 2020; 15(4):e0230967. View abstract
  14. Modelling the pandemic. BMJ. 2020 04 21; 369:m1567. View abstract
  15. Democracy and Mobility: A Preliminary Analysis of Global Adherence to Non-Pharmaceutical Interventions for COVID-19. SSRN. 2020 Apr 07; 3570206. View abstract
  16. Early in the epidemic: impact of preprints on global discourse about COVID-19 transmissibility. Lancet Glob Health. 2020 05; 8(5):e627-e630. View abstract
  17. The Role of Environmental Factors on Transmission Rates of the COVID-19 Outbreak: An Initial Assessment in Two Spatial Scales. SSRN. 2020 Mar 12; 3552677. View abstract
  18. Early in the Epidemic: Impact of Preprints on Global Discourse of 2019-nCoV Transmissibility. SSRN. 2020 Feb 12; 3536663. View abstract
  19. Early Transmissibility Assessment of a Novel Coronavirus in Wuhan, China. SSRN. 2020 Jan 24; 3524675. View abstract
  20. Science Should Drive Vaccine Policy. JAMA Netw Open. 2019 08 02; 2(8):e1910170. View abstract
  21. Estimation of Pneumonic Plague Transmission in Madagascar, August-November 2017. PLoS Curr. 2018 Nov 01; 10. View abstract
  22. Seasonality of birth defects in West Africa: could congenital Zika syndrome be to blame? F1000Res. 2018; 7:159. View abstract
  23. County-level assessment of United States kindergarten vaccination rates for measles mumps rubella (MMR) for the 2014-2015 school year. Vaccine. 2017 11 07; 35(47):6444-6450. View abstract
  24. Nosocomial amplification of MERS-coronavirus in South Korea, 2015. Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg. 2017 06 01; 111(6):261-269. View abstract
  25. Vaccine compliance and the 2016 Arkansas mumps outbreak. Lancet Infect Dis. 2017 04; 17(4):361-362. View abstract
  26. A Platform for Monitoring Regional Antimicrobial Resistance, Using Online Data Sources: ResistanceOpen. J Infect Dis. 2016 12 01; 214(suppl_4):S393-S398. View abstract
  27. Risks of Death and Severe Disease in Patients With Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus, 2012-2015. Am J Epidemiol. 2016 09 15; 184(6):460-4. View abstract
  28. Yellow fever vaccination coverage heterogeneities in Luanda province, Angola. Lancet Infect Dis. 2016 09; 16(9):993-995. View abstract
  29. Utilizing Nontraditional Data Sources for Near Real-Time Estimation of Transmission Dynamics During the 2015-2016 Colombian Zika Virus Disease Outbreak. JMIR Public Health Surveill. 2016 Jun 01; 2(1):e30. View abstract
  30. Mortality Risk Factors for Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Outbreak, South Korea, 2015. Emerg Infect Dis. 2015 Nov; 21(11):2088-90. View abstract
  31. Vaccination Compliance and the US Measles Epidemic--Reply. JAMA Pediatr. 2015 Sep; 169(9):877-8. View abstract
  32. The velocity of Ebola spread in parts of west Africa. Lancet Infect Dis. 2015 Sep; 15(9):1005-1007. View abstract
  33. Substandard vaccination compliance and the 2015 measles outbreak. JAMA Pediatr. 2015 May; 169(5):494-5. View abstract
  34. 2014 ebola outbreak: media events track changes in observed reproductive number. PLoS Curr. 2015 Apr 28; 7. View abstract
  35. Estimation of MERS-Coronavirus Reproductive Number and Case Fatality Rate for the Spring 2014 Saudi Arabia Outbreak: Insights from Publicly Available Data. PLoS Curr. 2014 Dec 18; 6. View abstract