I believe that every person is valuable and deserves respect, regardless of their ability or disability, and regardless of the severity of their disability.

MEDICAL SERVICES

EDUCATION

Medical School

  • Yale University , 1973 , New Haven , CA

Internship

  • Duke University , 1974 , Durham , NC

Residency

  • Duke University , 1974 , Durham , NC

Residency

  • University of Michigan , 1978 , Ann Arbor , MI

Fellowship

  • University of Michigan , 1978 , Ann Arbor , MI

Fellowship

  • Harvard Medical School , 1999 , Boston , MA

Philosophy of Care

I became interested in neurology when I was in high school and wanted to learn how the brain works. I entered medicine in order to take care of patients with brain problems, choosing neurology over psychiatry because it seemed like a better fit for me.

PROFESSIONAL HISTORY

My Professional and academic activities are concentrated on the issues related to neurodevelopmental disabilities (NDD), particularly epilepsy, cerebral palsy, intellectual disability (what used to be called mental retardation) and autism. In June 2004 I became the President of the American Association on Mental Retardation (AAMR). While I was President, I began the process that led to changing the name of the organization to the American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (AAIDD) in 2008. I was also a co-author on the official document that changed the name from mental retardation to intellectual disability. I have had a long-standing interest in ethics and spirituality related to neurodevelopmental disabilities. I have written many articles on the treatment of epilepsy ion children with other neurodevelopmental disabilities, and this continues to be a large part of my clinical practice. I have been the neurologist at a school for autism for the past 12 years, where I also treat many children who had seizures. At BCH I am part of the team caring for children with cerebral palsy and continue to participate in continuing education activities on that topic.

CERTIFICATIONS

  • American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology, Child and Adolescent Neurology

PUBLICATIONS

Publications powered by Harvard Catalyst Profiles

  1. Covid-Bound: A Pandemic Idyl. Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2021 02; 29(2):214-215. View abstract
  2. Commentary on "At Swami's Rock". Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2021 Jan; 29(1):101-102. View abstract
  3. Mortality in infantile spasms: A hospital-based study. Epilepsia. 2020 04; 61(4):702-713. View abstract
  4. Relapse. Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2020 10; 28(10):1128. View abstract
  5. The Last Day: May 10, 2019. Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2020 03; 28(3):381. View abstract
  6. Three A.M. A Resident's Prayer. Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2019 Oct; 27(10):1160. View abstract
  7. May You Go Safely. Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2019 09; 27(9):1027. View abstract
  8. Leaving It Behind and Letting Go. Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2019 06; 27(6):652. View abstract
  9. Thanatopsis. Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2019 Mar; 27(3):335-336. View abstract
  10. Blasted Hopes and Wasted Dreams. Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2018 11; 26(11):1190. View abstract
  11. The Storm. Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2018 Jun 05. View abstract
  12. Commentary on Poems for the American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry. Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2017 11; 25(11):1288. View abstract
  13. Whistling Past the Graveyard. Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2017 Oct; 25(10):1171. View abstract
  14. Corticosteroid therapy in regressive autism: a retrospective study of effects on the Frequency Modulated Auditory Evoked Response (FMAER), language, and behavior. BMC Neurol. 2014 May 15; 14:70. View abstract
  15. Experience with lacosamide in a series of children with drug-resistant focal epilepsy. Pediatr Neurol. 2011 Jun; 44(6):414-9. View abstract
  16. Avoiding pitfalls in molecular genetic testing: case studies of high-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization testing in the definitive diagnosis of Mowat-Wilson syndrome. J Mol Diagn. 2011 May; 13(3):363-7. View abstract
  17. Rufinamide for the treatment of epileptic spasms. Epilepsy Behav. 2011 Feb; 20(2):344-8. View abstract
  18. Public policy and the enhancement of desired outcomes for persons with intellectual disability. Intellect Dev Disabil. 2009 Aug; 47(4):307-19. View abstract
  19. Characteristics and needs of people with intellectual disability who have higher IQs. Intellect Dev Disabil. 2009 Jun; 47(3):220-33. View abstract
  20. Conceptualizing supports and the support needs of people with intellectual disability. Intellect Dev Disabil. 2009 Apr; 47(2):135-46. View abstract
  21. The intellectual disability construct and its relation to human functioning. Intellect Dev Disabil. 2008 Aug; 46(4):311-8. View abstract
  22. Cardiac manifestations in a child with a novel mutation in creatine transporter gene SLC6A8. Neurology. 2008 Apr 29; 70(18):1642-4. View abstract
  23. The renaming of mental retardation: understanding the change to the term intellectual disability. Intellect Dev Disabil. 2007 Apr; 45(2):116-24. View abstract
  24. Identification of a novel polymorphism--the duplication of the NPHP1 (nephronophthisis 1) gene. . 2006 Sep 01; 140A(17):1876-9. View abstract
  25. Presidential address 2005: peace-making is the answer: spiritual valorization and the future of our field. Ment Retard. 2006 Feb; 44(1):64-70. View abstract
  26. L-carnitine supplementation in childhood epilepsy: current perspectives. Epilepsia. 1998 Nov; 39(11):1216-25. View abstract
  27. Effectiveness and cost of generic versus brand-name valproic acid. Ment Retard. 1997 Dec; 35(6):472-5. View abstract
  28. Comprehensive management of epilepsy in persons with mental retardation. Epilepsia. 1997; 38 Suppl 4:S24-31. View abstract
  29. Prevention as a form of support: implications for the new definition. Ment Retard. 1996 Apr; 34(2):108-16. View abstract
  30. Early neurodevelopmental growth in children with vertically transmitted human immunodeficiency virus infection. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 1995 Aug; 149(8):850-5. View abstract
  31. The changing conception of mental retardation: implications for the field. Ment Retard. 1994 Jun; 32(3):181-93. View abstract
  32. Neuroaxonal dystrophy at birth with hypertonicity and basal ganglia mineralization. J Child Neurol. 1994 Jan; 9(1):74-6. View abstract
  33. Epilepsy and mental retardation: an overview. Am J Ment Retard. 1993; 98 Suppl:1-11. View abstract
  34. An ecology of prevention for the future. Ment Retard. 1992 Dec; 30(6):363-9. View abstract
  35. The failure of prevention. Ment Retard. 1991 Oct; 29(5):iii-iv. View abstract
  36. Withdrawal of barbiturate anticonvulsant drugs: prospective controlled study. Am J Ment Retard. 1988 Nov; 93(3):320-7. View abstract
  37. Beyond Baby Doe: does infant transplantation justify euthanasia? J Assoc Pers Sev Handicaps. 1988; 13(2):71-5. View abstract
  38. Continuous infantile spasms as a form of status epilepticus. J Child Neurol. 1986 Jul; 1(3):215-7. View abstract
  39. Information needs of parents of children with epilepsy. J Dev Behav Pediatr. 1985 Dec; 6(6):334-8. View abstract
  40. Capsular stroke as a cause of hemiplegia in infancy. Neurology. 1983 Aug; 33(8):1044-6. View abstract
  41. Capsular stroke in congenital complete heart block. Eur J Pediatr. 1982 Sep; 139(1):71-2. View abstract
  42. Benign neonatal sleep myoclonus. Arch Neurol. 1982 Mar; 39(3):191-2. View abstract
  43. Hyperammonemia and asterixis with valproic acid. Neurology. 1981 Dec; 31(12):1580. View abstract