Research

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David N. Williams, PhD

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Division
Adolescent and Young Adult Medicine Research
Hospital Title:
Senior Biostatistician
Academic Title:
Instructor of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School
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Research Overview

David N Williams' principal research interest is in optimizing clinical research by the application of qualitative, mixed and survey research methods. The goal of this effort is to expand on the capabilities and rigor of clinical research at Boston Children's Hospital and HMS. His and his colleagues' studies have included: transgender health risk factors, clinical guideline development for rare oncological health outcomes, optimization of parent counseling under conditions of adverse health outcomes, increasing awareness and screening of narcolepsy. These studies have have resulted in an increased understanding of risk factors in transgender youth, better understanding of parent experiences and needs in situations of extreme adverse health outcomes, clinical guidelines for the management of childhood cancer survivors at risk of cerebral vascular disease.

About the Researcher

Dr. Williams is the Senor Biostatistician for the division of Medical Education and for Adolescent and Young Adult Medicine as well as for support of qualitative and mixed methods research across multiple divisions. In this role he is responsible for supporting research projects across a wide variety of clinical topics relevant to medical education, adolescent health, as well as all areas where qualitative and mixed methods research may advance clinical understanding. He collaborates with a wide range of researchers in contributing to the design and analysis of observational cohorts, clinical trials as well as survey, qualitative and mixed methods research as well as research grant applications. He also teaches survey research design and analysis as well as qualitative research approaches and methods to BCH researchers.

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