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Winau Lab Highlights

October 25, 2016  

Modulation of Scramblase: a novel paradigm to fight chronic infection and cancer 

Scramblase
T lymphocytes, or T-cells, are critical sentinels that eliminate viruses and tumors. However, their strength to find and destroy their diseased targets often declines during chronic infections and cancer - a state referred to as T-cell exhaustion.

Reversal of T-cell exhaustion by blocking of the immune checkpoints by programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) has been demonstrated to be remarkably successful in treating a wide range of cancers.

Understanding the cause and regulation of T-cell exhaustion could help to discover novel therapeutic targets and to improve current therapies for chronic infections and cancer.
 

 

Related Investigator

Florian Winau, M.D. 

FlorianWinau


   
September 1, 2016  

CD1a molecule as a potential therapeutic target in inflammatory skin diseases 

Poison ivy: an insidious plant that, when brushed up against, quickly initiates an allergic reaction comprising red skin, swelling, burning, and intense itching that can last for weeks. What's more? Poison ivy grows in all but four states in the U.S., as well as in parts of Asia. The threat of this allergic reaction is ubiquitous, and no immediate cure has been found - yet. Enter, the molecule CD1a. 

CD1aIn a report published online this week in Nature Immunology, Dr. Ji Hyung Kim and Dr. Florian Winau, Boston Children's Hospital's Program in Cellular and Molecular Medicine and the Department of Microbiology and Immunobiology at Harvard Medical School, have been studying the role of CD1a on Langerhans cells in skin immunity through the use of a transgenic mouse model that expresses human CD1a. As human Langerhans cells express CD1a and those in mice do not, studying CD1a's role on Langerhans cells was not feasible in a mouse model. The Winau laboratory's study will be the first published on the role of CD1a in skin immunity using an in vivo system.



 

Related Investigator

Florian Winau, M.D. 

FlorianWinau


   
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