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Patterns in the chaos

Highlights from informatics research at Children's
The story of blockbuster drug-gone-wrong Vioxx is now infamous: The popular painkiller came on the market in 1999, was taken by millions of people, and was finally withdrawn in 2004 after it was found to dramatically increase the risk of heart attack and stroke... [Click to read more.]

Mapping diabetes through social media
Children's partners with TuDiabetes to track diabetes metrics online
TuDiabetes.org, a social network for people touched by diabetes, has partnered with Boston Children's Hospital in the creation and launch of a new application called "TuAnalyze"... [Click to read more.]

Flagging domestic abuse
"Intelligent" medical records could help clinicians identify abuse sooner
Tapping commonly available electronic health records, predictive computer models could help doctors diagnose domestic abuse an average of 10 to 30 months earlier... [Click to read more.]

An off-the-wall approach to autism
Using informatics to connect the dots in autism, search for root causes
Gazing out over the Harvard Medical School quad, Dennis Wall, PhD, isn't thinking about his research into the genetic causes of autism or the development of his ground-breaking Autworks Web site. He's more concerned with the whereabouts of campus security. "They frown on skateboarding here," he says... [Click to read more.]

HealthMap tracks H1N1's path 
Demonstrating the value of the Internet in global disease surveillance
As H1N1 began to emerge in April 2009, HealthMap--an automated online disease tracking and mapping tool created by researchers in the Informatics Program at Boston Children's Hospital--was already collecting information about the virus... [Click to read more.]

Facebook fights the flu
Encouraging people to be vaccinated, via social networking
H1N1 and seasonal influenza beware -- new heroes have arrived, ready to defend the population and fight a viral battle, via Facebook... [Click to read more.]

Sounding out disease
Turning gene activity data into music?
"That tumor sounds worse." That's what doctors could be saying in the future if a recently developed computer program, which turns gene and protein expression data into music, takes off... [Click to read more.]

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