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Media Coverage of Our Research

September 2013: Our recent Science paper in the News. Please see the stories below:

 

Scientists unravel obesity surgery’s potent effect on diabetes

For years, doctors have been intrigued and mystified by the remarkable power of weight-loss surgery to treat type 2 diabetes. Stomach-shrinking gastric bypass surgery is typically used to treat extremely obese patients, but it has become clear that the intervention is more potent than doctors anticipated. Patients are often taken off of diabetes medicines before they have had significant weight loss — and before they even leave the hospital. (Please click here to read the full article).

 

'Diabetes-cure' operation explained

The reason some patients are cured of type-2 diabetes after a gastric bypass may have been explained by US researchers. Their animal study showed bypassing the stomach made the intestines work harder, use more energy and keep blood sugar levels under control. (Please click here to read the full article).

 


How does gastric bypass surgery cure Type 2 Diabetes? Doctors aim to 'bypass the bypass' by helping the small intestines of diabetes patients get rid of excess glucose.

Gastric bypass surgery often improves the symptoms of type 2 diabetes, even before patients start to lose weight. Why? (Please click here to read the full article).

 

Gastric bypass makes gut burn sugar faster. Diabetic rats control blood glucose better after weight-loss surgery.

A procedure increasingly used to treat obesity by reducing the size of the stomach also reprogrammes the intestines, making them burn sugar faster, a study in diabetic and obese rats has shown. (Please click here to read the full article).

 

Gastric bypass surgery causes sugar-burning gut growth in rats. Intestinal changes could explain rapid improvements in diabetes.

A beefed-up chunk of intestines might do the heavy lifting of gastric bypass surgery. The surgery’s rapid diabetes-improving effects appear to stem from growth of new intestinal tissue. After having an operation to remodel the gut, obese rats build the new tissue by drawing sugar from the blood, researchers report in the July 26 Science. (Please click here to read the full article).

 

Intestine emerges as new focus of type 2 diabetes treatment in Boston Children’s Hospital study

When considering type 2 diabetes, one often thinks of the synonymous terms of glucose, insulin and pancreas­—but a team of researchers from Boston Children's Hospital would like the medical research community to insert a new word into that vernacular: intestine.  In a new study published in the journal Science, a team led by Dr. Nicholas Stylopoulos, a researcher in Boston Children's Hospital's Division of Endocrinology, offers evidence that the small intestine—which is often regarded as a "passive" organ—has surprising involvement in the body's metabolism. Their paradigm-shifting findings could have tremendous impact on the way patients with type 2 diabetes are treated in the future. (Please click here to read the full article).

 

Bypass für den Bypass. Forscher finden eine Erklärung, warum eine Magen-OP bei Diabetes hilft 

Physiologie. - Menschen mit starkem Übergewicht entwickeln häufig noch weitere Stoffwechselstörungen wie beispielsweise Diabetes. Als Ärzte vor Jahren damit begannen, extreme Fettleibigkeit mit einem Magen-Bypass zu therapieren, stellten sie überraschend fest, dass mit der Operation meistens auch der Diabetes verschwand. (Please click here to read the full article).

 

Gastric bypass makes gut burn sugar faster. Diabetic rats were found to control blood glucose better after undergoing the weight-loss surgery

A procedure increasingly used to treat obesity by reducing the size of the stomach also reprograms the intestines, making them burn sugar faster, a study in diabetic and obese rats has shown. (Please click here to read the full article).

 

Νέα στοιχεία για το πως το γαστρικό bypass θεραπεύει τον διαβήτη 

Απάντηση το ερώτημα πως θεραπεύονται από τον διαβήτη τύπου ΙΙ ορισμένοι ασθενείς που έχουν υποβληθεί σε επέμβαση γαστρικού bypass δίνουν αμερικανοί επιστήμονες, σύμφωνα με στοιχεία που δημοσιεύονται στο Science. (Please click here to read the full article).

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