Research

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Gregory Laboratory - Lab Members

Principle Investigator

Richard Gregory, PhD
rgregory@enders.tch.harvard.edu

Richard established his laboratory at Boston Children's Hospital in 2006. Dr. Gregory received a Ph.D. from Cambridge University, UK in 2001, studying genomic imprinting at the Babraham Institute. Dr. Gregory performed his postdoctoral work at the Fox Chase Cancer Center and the Wistar Institute, Philadelphia. His postdoctoral research focused on mechanisms of miRNA biogenesis and function, and was supported by a Jane Coffin Childs Research Fellowship. In addition to his appointments at Boston Children's Hospital and the Harvard Medical School, he is a Principal Member of the Harvard Stem Cell Institute.

His laboratory's research focus is on understanding the pathways of how small regulatory RNAs are generated, how they exert their gene regulatory function, their role in the self-renewal and pluripotency of embryonic stem (ES) cells, and their relevance to human disease. RNA interference (RNAi) describes the recently identified phenomenon whereby small non-coding RNAs can silence gene expression. It is emerging that cells possess a wide repertoire of tiny regulatory RNAs that are critical for a variety of biological pathways and can repress genes via numerous mechanisms. For posttranscriptional gene silencing, microRNAs (miRNAs), and small inhibitory RNAs (siRNAs), function as guide molecules inducing mRNA degradation or translational repression. In mammals, hundreds of miRNAs have been identified, and have been implicated in controlling diverse developmental pathways. Indeed, recent predictions indicate that over one third of all human genes are targeted by miRNAs.

Post-Doctoral Fellows

Peng Du, PhD
peng.du@childrens.harvard.edu

Peng is originally from Shandong, China. He received Ph.D. from the Peking University where he focused on the antiviral roles of RNA silencing in plants. He joined the Gregory lab in September 2012, and currently he’s studying the mechanism on the regulation of primary microRNAs in stem cells. When not in lab, he enjoys playing basketball and traveling.

Shuibin Lin, PhD
shuibin.lin@childrens.harvard.edu

Recipient of the Damon Runyon-Sohn Pediatric Cancer Fellowship Award, 2013-2016

Shuibin received his PhD from the College of Medicine at the University of Florida, the Gator Nation. He joined the Gregory lab in Nov, 2012 and is currently trying to manipulate the Let-7 miRNA biogenesis pathway and cancer related LincRNAs for potential cancer therapeutic strategies.  When not in the lab, he enjoys going to the playground with his kid.

Robinson Triboulet, PhD
robinson.triboulet@childrens.harvard.edu

Recipient of the 2011 Simeon Burt Wolbach Research Fellowship Fund

Robinson earned his Bachelor's and Master's degree respectively in Biochemistry and in Biology and Health from University of Montpellier II, France. He then received his PhD from University of Montpellier I, France in 2007. At that time his primary research focused on the role of microRNA in HIV-1 infection in the Laboratory of Molecular Virology at the Institute of Human Genetics. Presently, he studies the mechanisms involved in the regulation of Microprocessor activity.

Yoshinori Nishimoto, MD, PhD
yoshinori.nishimoto@childrens.harvard.edu

Yoshinori received both his MD and Ph.D. from Keio University School of Medicine in Japan.  He has a particular interest in studying the treatment of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS).  As a member of  the Gregory lab, Yoshinori is taking on the challenge of investigating the mechanisms of non-coding RNAs in  neuronal development and  motor neuron disease. When  not in the lab, he enjoys visiting historic places and museums; watching ballet, orchestras, and sporting events; and strengthening his body.

Mehdi Pirouz, PhD
mehdi.pirouz@childrens.harvard.edu

Junho Choe, PhD
junho.choe@childrens.harvard.edu

Lab Manager

Carmen Rios, MS, MBA
carmen.rios@childrens.harvard.edu

Born and raised in Texas, Carmen earned her Bachelor’s degree in Biomedical Engineering from the University of Texas in 2006, her MBA degree from the University of Houston in 2010, and her Master’s degree in Bioengineering from the University of Pittsburgh in 2012. When not in the lab, Carmen enjoys yoga and salsa dancing. She also enjoys going to the theater to watch broadway musicals, plays, ballets, and operas.

Tech Specialist

Marzia Munafo, MS
marzia.munafo@childrens.harvard.edu


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