Recent Developments

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Manton Center for Orphan Disease Research

Dr. Alan Beggs was recently named the Sir Edwin and Lady Manton Associate Professor of Pediatrics in the Field of Genetics at Harvard Medical School, as well as the first Director of the new Manton Center for Orphan Disease Research at Children's Hospital. The center supports research and training, and it raises awareness and funding for the broad range of "orphan" diseases that affect people worldwide. For more information on the Manton Center, click below:

Boston Children's Hospital Press Release for the Manton Center

Beggs Lab Annual Newsletter

Since 2005, the Beggs Lab has been publishing an annual newsletter. Generally released around the holiday season, it highlights our accomplishments for the previous year. It is mailed to all of our participants, prospective participants and referring physicians without whom our research wouldn't be possible. We hope that the newsletter not only displays our profound gratitude to all who support our research, but that it will also serve to inspire those whose lives have been affected by this family of diseases. Please click on the links below to see the progress our lab has made!

Beggs Lab Newsletter Spring 2013

Beggs Lab Newsletter Winter 2011-2012

Beggs Lab Newsletter Winter 2010-2011

Advancements in Diamond-Blackfan Anemia Research

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Current Articles on Diamond-Blackfan Anemia

Below, please find recent Children's News articles discussing Dr. Hanna Gazda's research on the rare disease Diamond-Blackfan Anemia.

Dr. Hanna Gazda's search for answers about Diamond-Blackfan Anemia

More information on Diamond-Blackfan Anemia

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Understanding the Mechanisms of Muscle Weakness

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How do mutations in the gene affect muscle weakness?

The following articles discuss Dr. Beggs' recent research findings pertaining to Centronuclear Myopathy, as well as web-based animations that display how some genetic mutations affect the muscle's ability to contract in Nemaline Myopathy. The animations also show the basics of muscle contraction/pathology, so that readers can better understand how genetic mutations disrupt a muscle's normal functioning. Please click below for more information:

"Searching for Strength: One Gene at a Time"

"Nemaline Myopathy – Many Paths to Weakness"

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The future of pediatrics will be forged by thinking differently, breaking paradigms and joining together in a shared vision of tackling the toughest challenges before us.”
- Sandra L. Fenwick, President and CEO
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