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REBIScan

REBIScan, located in Cambridge, Mass., was cofounded in 2009 by clinician-innovator David Hunter, MD, PhD, chief of ophthalmology at Boston Children's Hospital. REBIScan is building technology to eliminate preventable vision loss in children. One in 20 children is at risk of vision loss from the eye condition amblyopia (lazy eye), which cannot be recognized by parents and is not easily diagnosed by pediatricians. REBIScan's lead product, the Pediatric Vision Scanner (PVS), is a new technology for early, cost-effective detection of amblyopia and strabismus (crossed eyes) in preschool children.

About our partnership

In 2012, REBIScan exclusively licensed the PVS from Boston Children's for early detection of amblyopia. The condition is easy to treat if diagnosed early—before age 3. But because the condition is not noticed in half of affected children until it may be too late (around 8 to 10 years of age), amblyopia is now the number one cause of pediatric vision loss.

Hunter first conceived and prototyped the PVS at John's Hopkins University along with his mentor David Guyton, MD, and further developed the PVS at Boston Children's. The device uses a laser to scan a patient's retinas to detect amblyopia automatically with high sensitivity. The PVS is easy-to-use and quickly makes a diagnosis at a patient’s annual well visit. While at Boston Children's Hospital, Hunter had help optimizing the device from Boston Children's Technology Development Fund, as well as outside funding through the National Eye Institute and private donors.

In an independent clinical study published in the July 2014 issue of JAMA Ophthalmology, REBIScan's PVS device outperformed the SureSight (a competitor) in sensitivity, identifying 97 percent of children affected by amblyopia or strabismus. The company is currently awaiting approval for clinical use by the Food and Drug Administration and will seek additional investments to manufacture and distribute the device.

In 2014, the PVS was selected from over 50+ applicants to win the $50,000 Sheikh El Zayed Pediatric Medical Device Innovation Award.

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