Does that health app on your phone have a privacy policy?
Are you sure about that?

by Tom Ulrich

Privacy policies are a sore point for Internet users. At least once a year the pitchforks and torches come out when a company like Facebook or Twitter changes its policies around how it uses, sells or secures users’ data—things like browsing habits, phone numbers, relationships and email addresses.
You don’t hear as much hue and cry over the privacy of mobile health apps, where people store and track what are literally their most intimate details. But perhaps you should.

Stem cell medicine gets a “roadmap” and a quality assurance tool

by Nancy Fliesler

If you’ve lost your way on the Boston subway, you need only consult a map to find the best route to your destination. Now stem cell engineers have a similar map to guide the making of cells and tissues for disease modeling, drug testing and regenerative medicine. It’s a computer algorithm known as CellNet...

Bill Taylor:
Conform or defy?

Too many leaders fail to set the stage for success, says Bill Taylor, co-founder and founding editor of Fast Company. We’re thrilled to share Taylor’s secrets during his keynote speech at our “Global Pediatric Innovation Summit + Awards 2014.”

Can old peripheral nerves learn new tricks?

Only the Schwann cells know for sure

by Nancy Fliesler

About six weeks ago, a glass shattered in my hand, severing the nerve in my pinky finger. The feeling in my fingertip still hasn’t returned, and now I know why: I’m too old.

“Deep sequencing” finds hidden causes of brain disorders

It’s become clear that our DNA is far from identical from cell to cell and that disease-causing mutations can happen in some of our cells and not others, arising at some point after we’re conceived. These so-called somatic mutations—affecting just a percentage of cells—are subtle and easy to overlook, even with next-generation genomic sequencing. And they could be more important in neurologic and psychiatric disorders than we thought.

Are innovators allergic to failure?

Leonard Zon, MD, founder and director of the Stem Cell Program at Boston Children’s Hospital and a pioneer in the use of zebrafish as a platform for drug discovery, recounts the failure that launched his career.

Innovation myth busters: Great ideas are not enough

You have a great idea for an innovative quality improvement tool for health care! Now what? Steve Jobs once said that people make the mistake of thinking that a really great idea is 90 percent of the work. “...the problem with that is, is that there is just a tremendous amount of craftsmanship in between a great idea and a great product,” he explained.

Yelp: A new tool for foodborne illness surveillance?

September 15, 2014

by Tom Ulrich

You just had a great meal at a restaurant. So you grab your phone and fire off a glowing review on Yelp.
Consider the opposite scenario: You just had a horrible meal at a restaurant...

Global Pediatric Innovation Summit + Awards 2014

October 30 + 31, 2014 @BCH_Innovation
• Learn from the dynamic exchange between innovators and investors in the new Innovation Tank.
• Be inspired by experts who are developing solutions in the fields of rare diseases; predictive analytics and big data; and mobile and digital health
• This event will convene top thought leaders to address the toughest challenges in pediatric health care today.

Featured Researchers + Innovators

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    Heung Bae Kim, MD first conceived the Serial Transverse Enteroplasty (STEP) in 1992 and developed the procedure, which has become the global standard for intestinal lengthening in children with short bowel syndrome, in the early 2000’s.

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    Alan Beggs, PhD is director of The Manton Center for Orphan Disease Research at Boston Children's Hospital and the Sir Edward and Lady Manton Professor of Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School.

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    Michael Agus, MD, developed a pediatric-specific, elastic multi-electrode ECG strip. The innovation addresses the delay and interpretation challenges associated with using adult ECG lead-placement technologies on small children.

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    Pedro del Nido, MD's basic research is directed at understanding the metabolic and structural changes due to left ventricular hypertrophy.

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    Vincent Chiang, MD leveraged a Boston Children’s Innovation Acceleration Program FastTrack Innovation in Technology Award to develop DisCo, a program that lets caregivers text/email families while keeping personal information private.

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    Wayne Lencer, MD. The Lencer laboratory studies the cell and molecular biology of vesicular transport in polarized epithelial cells and regulation of ion transport in the intestine.

Featured Research Laboratories

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    Beggs Laboratory: Current studies are aimed at identification of new nemaline myopathy genes, understanding the basis for the variability observed, and determining how these mutations affect muscle function and lead to weakness.

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    The Lencer Laboratory is located in the GI Cell and Developmental Biology Laboratories in the GI Division at Boston Children's Hospital.

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    Sports Medicine Research Laboratory
    Led by principal investigator Dr. Martha M. Murray, focuses on sports medicine injuries, including those of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), knee meniscus and articular cartilage.

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    Sankaran Laboratory
    Utilizing rare and common human genetic variation to improve our understanding of red blood cell production and globin gene regulation with application to numerous blood diseases.

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    The Zon Laboratory focuses on the use of the zebrafish model for research into hematopoiesis and as a screen for oncogenic genes and proteins. 

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    The Gaab Laboratory
    Our multidisciplinary team of researchers brings together curious scientists from the basic and applied sciences, such as neuroscience, psychology, and education.

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