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Acupuncture

  • Acupuncture refers to the insertion of tiny, hair-thin needles into the skin at strategic points to ease pain and treat many diseases. 

    Practiced in China for more than 2,000 years, acupuncture is based on the belief that the body contains energy called Qi that flows throughout the body on pathways called meridians.

    When you’re healthy, this energy flows freely; but when you’re ill, the energy may be weak or blocked. During acupuncture treatment, the therapist tries to improve the energy flow along the meridians.

    The majority of our patients are seen for:

    • Headaches
    • Abdominal pain
    • Limb pain
    • Back pain
    • Chest pain

    In addition, we see children with:

    • Cancer
    • Sickle cell disease
    • Hemophilia
    • Cystic fibrosis
    • Endometriosis
    • Crohn’s disease

    How Boston Children’s Hospital Approaches Acupuncture

    Acupuncture is performed by a doctor fully licensed in western medicine who's also had thorough training in acupuncture as a specialty practice. The Medical Acupuncture Service at Boston Children's is one of the most active pediatric medical acupuncture services in the country.

    Contact Us

    Medical Acupuncture Service
    Boston Children's Hospital
    300 Longwood Avenue
    Farley 308
    Boston MA 02115

    Boston Children's at Waltham
    9 Hope Avenue 
    Waltham MA 02453


    781-216-3700
    fax: 781-216-2540

  • What is acupuncture?

    Acupuncture refers to the insertion of tiny, hair-thin needles through the skin into underlying tissues at strategic points to ease pain and treat many diseases. It’s been practiced in China for more than 2,000 years.

    Acupuncture is based on the belief that the body contains energy called Qi (pronounced “chee”) that flows throughout the body on pathways called meridians and maintains health and life. When you’re healthy, this energy flows freely; but when you’re ill, the energy may be weak or blocked. During acupuncture treatment, the therapist tries to improve the energy flow along the meridians.

    How does acupuncture work?

    According to principles of traditional Chinese medicine, the proper flow of Qi may be restored by the insertion of tiny, hair-thin needles at selected combinations of the 365 classical acupuncture points, which are located along the meridians. The improved energy flow produced by acupuncture results in stimulation of the body’s natural healing abilities.

    Scientific research suggests that needling acupuncture points stimulates the body to release chemicals into the nervous system and into the bloodstream. These chemicals change the experience of pain and trigger the release of other chemicals which influence the body’s internal regulatory systems.

    How can acupuncture help my child?

    Acupuncture has proven successful in treating chronic pain conditions without side effects. It’s also shown to be helpful in treating patients for:

    • Postoperative surgery and dental pain
    • Nausea and vomiting related to chemotherapy
    • Sinusitis, bronchitis, and asthma
    • Gastritis, colitis, hiccups, constipation
    • Abdominal pain
    • Headaches
    • Lower back and neck pain

    What is medical acupuncture?

    Here at Boston Children’s, we use the term “medical acupuncture” to describe our treatment, which means it’s performed by a doctor fully licensed in western medicine who’s also had thorough training in acupuncture as a specialty practice.  The advantage is that the physician is able to integrate both Western medicine and acupuncture to treat illness.

    Are there any side effects?

    Acupuncture usually does not produce any side effects.

    Is it safe?

    Yes, we use only sterile, disposable stainless steel needles in our clinic. There is no risk of acquiring transmissible, blood-borne diseases from the acupuncture treatments.

  • What happens before the treatment?

    The acupuncturist talks with you and your child about his or her health history, including medications, diets and daily habits. The acupuncturist examines your child’s tongue and checks the pulse in both wrists.

    How old do you need to be to receive acupuncture?

    Infants as young as three weeks old can undergo acupuncture therapy.

  • The biggest challenge in pediatric acupuncture is addressing children’s fear of needles. To deal with this issue, Dr. Lin or a member of his staff often spends up to an hour with first-time patients and their families to make them completely comfortable with the procedure.

    What should my child expect?

    Your child will lie on a padded table. The acupuncturist will insert very thin, solid, stainless steel needles into key points on his or her body. Because the needles are solid, they don’t hurt as much as when using the regular IV needles. Most children feel only minimal pain as the needles are inserted (a tingling sensation), and some feel no pain at all.

    Dr. Lin carefully explains the process and can demonstrate it on a child’s toy animal or even on his own hand. Once the needles are in place, no pain is felt and most children begin to feel comfortable and relaxed. Each treatment usually takes between 30 and 60 minutes.

    How many treatments do I need?

    The majority of patients come weekly for four to six weeks and then return for monthly follow-ups.

    Will my insurance cover it?

    Despite the documented benefits of acupuncture therapy, some insurance companies do not yet recognize the value. Please discuss your individual needs with us, and we will work to help you regardless of your financial situation or healthcare coverage.

    What happens before the treatment? 

    The acupuncturist talks with you and your child about his or her health history, including medications, diets and daily habits. The acupuncturist examines your child’s tongue and checks the pulse in both wrists. 

    How old do you need to be to receive acupuncture? 

    Infants as young as three weeks old can undergo acupuncture therapy.

  • Pinpointing Pain

    The summer before sixth grade, Tori Maurer’s back started to throb. She’d wake up stiff and sore, unable to move her neck. Every part of her body just plain hurt. Diagnosed with a large S curve in her back and fibromyalgia—a chronic condition marked by widespread pain and tender points in joints, muscles and tendons all over her body, Tori’s pain worsened when she hit puberty. 

    Soon, even the weight of her schoolbag on her back was unbearable. Strong drugs like Oxycontin and amitriptyline helped blunt the pain but they also altered her typically cheerful personality. “I felt like I was stuck in a fog, two steps away from myself,” she says. Her schoolwork suffered as she struggled to recall details from class and focus long enough to write an essay. Even with the medications, she still felt pain on most days. With severe limitations on what Tori could physically accomplish, and suffering from side effects of the drugs, it didn’t take long before she fell into a deep depression.

    Her mom, Donna, was at a loss. When a nurse in Children’s Hospital Boston’s Chronic Pain Management Clinic suggested Tori try acupuncture to relieve her pain, she jumped at the idea. But her daughter was skeptical at first and—like many children—frightened that the needles would hurt. “I didn’t understand how it could possibly work,” she says. Nonetheless, desperate for relief, she gave acupuncture—one of the oldest medical procedures in the world—a shot. Now, four years later, Tori gets regular acupuncture treatments, and credits her high quality of life to her frequent sessions with Yuan-Chi Lin, MD, MPH, director of Children’s Medical Acupuncture Service.

    Lin founded the program—the first pediatric acupuncture clinic in a major medical center in North America—in 2000. While alternative health care treatments like acupuncture might seem unusual in the pediatric sphere, a study released last year by the American Academy of Pediatrics reveals that its use is actually quite  widespread. It found that 20 to 40 percent of children use some form of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM); among chronically ill children, the number is more than 50 percent. Despite the fact that acupuncture is widely practiced in the United States and more than one-third of pain treatment centers provide acupuncture as a therapy, it’s used rarely in the treatment of children.

    As a pediatrician, anesthesiologist, pain specialist and medical acupuncturist, Lin is in a unique position to combine pediatric acupuncture with mainstream Western medicine. Although it can be hard to explain to families how acupuncture works, witnessing results can turn any naysayer into a believer. “Kids like to call it a magic stick,” he says, holding up a tiny needle. “There’s no medicine on the tip of this little device.” According to traditional Chinese medicine, vital energy (Qi) flows along specific pathways within the body. By inserting special needles through the skin at strategic points known as acupuncture points, you can rebalance energy and unblock obstructions. Modern scientific research suggests that needling acupuncture points stimulates the body to release chemicals into the nervous system and into the bloodstream. These chemicals change the experience of pain and trigger the release of other chemicals, which influence the body's internal regulatory systems. For some conditions, one treatment may provide rapid relief. In other situations, such as chronic pain management, a series of treatments may be required before positive effects are noted.

    As a migraine sufferer, clinic manager Margaret Lyons had plenty of firsthand experience with acupuncture before joining the Medical Acupuncture Service in 2002. “The treatment had been of great benefit to me personally for many years,” she says. Armed with her own personal knowledge, Lyons is well equipped to explain to patients what type of relief they may expect from the treatments. Patients and families often have varying attitudes about acupuncture, she says. “Some already have an interest in complementary medicine, most have been referred by other Western medicine specialists and are open, and some are skeptical but willing to try anything to help with their condition.” Over the seven years she’s been with the clinic, she’s noticed changes in the public’s perception of acupuncture. “It’s far more commonly sought out and accepted than it was when I started,” she says.

    During a recent acupuncture session, Tori lies on her back while Lin inserts small needles in her arms and legs. The needles don’t hurt at all, says Tori, and after each session she can move easier and with less pain. Some days she goes in and can’t move her head at all; within a few minutes, her neck is completely relaxed. She’s been able to drastically reduce the amount of pain medication she needs—a prime example of the complementary nature of acupuncture. According to her mom, Tori has gone from living a life where she was lucky if she made it from the bed to the couch, to an essentially normal teen existence.

    Nowadays, Tori plays on the varsity ice hockey team, which requires her to get up at 4 a.m. a few mornings a week for practice. It’s early, but hardly a sacrifice for the girl who considers being able to perform with her peers a colossal accomplishment. “She always says, she’d give up her meds but wouldn’t ever give up Dr. Lin and the acupuncture,” says her mom. “It’s really given her life back.”

The future of pediatrics will be forged by thinking differently, breaking paradigms and joining together in a shared vision of tackling the toughest challenges before us.”
- Sandra L. Fenwick, President and CEO
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