Brachial plexus birth palsy in Children

  • We push innovation in our department by sub-specializing--gaining ever more expertise with complex problems, and developing ever newer methods.

    --Peter Waters, MD, clinical chief, Orthopedic Center; director, Brachial Plexus Program, Boston Children's Hospital

    If your baby or child has been diagnosed with brachial plexus birth palsy (BPBP), we know that you and your family are worried about her future, and maybe even under some stress. So, please know that at Boston Children's Hospital, we will approach your child’s treatment and care with sensitivity and support—for your child and your whole family.

    If your child has BPBP, it means that during childbirth she had an injury to the brachial plexus (BP) network of nerves that travel from her neck, through the shoulder region down to the arm and hand. The BP nerve network provides the electrical power to all the muscles of her arm.

    • BPBP occurs in about one to three out of every 1,000 babies born.
    • The condition’s severity and type depend on:
      • where in the nerve injury occurs
      • whether the injury is a stretch, an incomplete tear or a complete tear (avulsion)
    • In over half of cases, the injury heals itself within the first month to six weeks.
    • Nerve surgery may be recommended if marked weakness persists after three to six months.
    • Some children benefit from muscle, tendon, bone and joint surgery between years age 2-5 years.
    • BPBP is a serious but treatable condition.

     

    How Boston Children's Hospital approaches brachial plexus birth palsy

    You can have peace of mind knowing that the team in Children’s Brachial Plexus Program has treated hundreds to thousands of babies and children—as well as adolescents, young adults and even professional athletes who’ve sustained traumatic BP injury.

    Some of the world’s most advanced clinical research into BP anatomy and treatment is coming from Boston Children’s researchers. So, we can provide your child with expert diagnosis, treatment and care—as well as the benefits of some of the best BPBP clinical and scientific research in the world.

    As one of the first comprehensive, multidisciplinary programs, Boston Children’s Orthopedic Center is the nation’s largest and most experienced pediatric orthopedic surgery center, performing more than 6,000 surgical procedures each year. Our program—ranked among the top in the nation by U.S. News & World Report—is the preeminent care and research center for children and young adults with congenital, neuromuscular, developmental and post-traumatic musculoskeletal problems.

    As a national and international referral center for children with brachial plexus birth palsy, the Brachial Plexus Program within the Orthopedic Care Center is among the largest in the world—caring for more than 1200 children with brachial plexus birth palsy since its inception.

    Using a research- and innovation-driven approach, our program’s team of surgeons, nurses and therapists provides services that include:

    Brachial plexus birth palsy: Reviewed by Peter Waters, MD
    © Boston Children’s Hospital, 2011

    A long line of orthopedic firsts

     With a long history of excellence and innovation and a team of clinicians and researchers at the forefront of orthopedic research and care, Boston Children’s is home to many treatment breakthroughs:

    • advanced techniques and microsurgery care for complex fractures and soft tissue injuries to the hand and upper extremity
    • advances in our spinal program, such as video-assisted thorascopic surgery
    • the oldest and largest comprehensive center for the care of spina bifida
    • a hip program that has performed over 1,400 periacetabular osteotomies
    • one of the first scoliosis clinics in the nation
    • one of the first sports medicine clinics in the nation
    • one of the first centers in the nation to use adjuvant chemotherapy and perform limb salvage surgery for patients with osteosarcoma
Request an Appointment

If this is a medical emergency, please dial 9-1-1. This form should not be used in an emergency.

Patient Information
Date of Birth:
Contact Information
Appointment Details
Send RequestIf you do not see the specialty you are looking for, please call us at: 617-355-6000.International visitors should call International Health Services at +1-617-355-5209.
Please complete all required fields

This department is currently not accepting appointment requests online. Please call us at: 617-355-6000. International +1-617-355-6000.

This department is currently not accepting appointment requests online. Please call us at: 617-355-6000. International +1-617-355-6000.

Thank you.

Your request has been successfully submitted

You will be contacted within 1 business day.

If you have questions or would like more information, please call:

617-355-6000 +1-617-355-6000
close
Find a Doctor
Search by Clinician's Last Name or Specialty:
Select by Location:
Search by First Letter of Clinician's Last Name: *ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ
BrowseSearch
Condition & Treatments
Search for a Condition or Treatment:
Show Items Starting With: *ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ
View allSearch
Locations

Contact the Brachial Plexus Program

  • 617-355-6021
  • International: +1-617-355-5209
  • Locations
The future of pediatrics will be forged by thinking differently, breaking paradigms and joining together in a shared vision of tackling the toughest challenges before us.”
- Sandra L. Fenwick, President and CEO
Close