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Thomas Schwarz, PhD
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Thomas Schwarz, PhD

Department: Neurology
Research Centers: F.M. Kirby Neurobiology Center
Hospital Title: Senior Associate in Neurology
Academic Title: Professor of Neurology and Neurobiology, Harvard Medical School
Research Area: Neurotransmitter secretion
membrane trafficking
Synapse Development
axonal transport
Parkinson's disease

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617-919-2219
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Research Overview

Our interests lie at the intersection of fundamental cell biology and the functional biology of neurons in particular. My laboratory focuses on: 1) the mechanism of secretion of neurotransmitters at synapses, 2) trafficking of membrane proteins and exocytosis, 3) axonal transport of organelles, particularly mitochondria, by kinesins and 4) the development of synapses. We approach each of these questions through a combination of genetics, biochemistry, electrophysiology, cell biology and microscopy--using the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster as an experimental organism, as well as mammalian neurons. A nerve contacting muscle at the fly neuromuscular junction.

How do membranes fuse? How do the mechanisms differ for different classes of neurotransmitter? How do molecular motors control the distribution of organelles? Because of its extraordinarily complex structure and highly regulated mode of exocytosis, the neuron offers special challenges to these and other general cell biological processes.

For example, every cell needs to regulate the number of mitochondria it contains and their distribution within the cell, but in neurons this task is particularly complex because axons can extend over a meter in length from the cell soma, and because different regions of the neuron can have very different energetic demands. Similarly, while every cell has internal membrane traffic and exocytosis at its surface, the neuron needs to regulate the release of neurotransmitter with sub-millisecond timing and with precise control of the number of vesicles to fuse. Therefore, we move back and forth from neurons to non-neuronal cells to understand the fundamental processes of membrane traffic and their specializations in neurons.

Recent projects have also caused us to examine the manner in which signals are communicated from the synapse to the nucleus and the cell biology and signaling events that are required to form a pre-synaptic nerve terminal. This research has also led us to study how compromise of these mechanisms contributes to neurodegeneration.

About Thomas Schwarz

Thomas Schwarz received a PhD in 1983 from the Neurobiology Department of Harvard Medical School. He completed postdoctoral training at the University of California, San Francisco in the laboratory of Lily and Yuh-Nung Jan, where he collaborated in the cloning of the Shaker gene, the first K+ gene to be cloned and sequenced. In 1989, he joined the faculty of Stanford University's Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology. In 2000, he and his family returned to Boston so that his wife, Sarah Luria, could assume a faculty position in American Literature at the College of the Holy Cross. Tom joined the Harvard faculty as a Professor of Neurology in the F.M. Kirby Neurobiology Center at Children's Hospital, with a joint appointment in the Neurobiology Department of Harvard Medical School. He serves on the Board of Scientific Overseers of the Jackson Laboratory in Bar Harbor, Maine. He also serves on the Board of Trustees of the Jewish Community Day School in Watertown, Mass., and resides with his wife and two children in Newton, Mass.

Key Publications 

  • Murthy M, Teodoro RO, Miller TP, Schwarz TL. Sec5, a member of the exocyst complex, mediates Drosophila embryo cellularization. Development 2010 Aug; 137(16):2773-83.
     
  • Mosca TJ, Schwarz TL. The nuclear import of Frizzled2-C by Importins-beta11 and alpha2 promotes postsynaptic development. Nat Neurosci 2010 Aug; 13(8):935-43.
     
  • Kurshan PT, Oztan A, Schwarz TL. Presynaptic alpha2delta-3 is required for synaptic morphogenesis independent of its Ca2+-channel functions. Nat Neurosci 2009 Nov; 12(11):1415-23.
     
  • Wang X, Schwarz TL. The mechanism of Ca2+ -dependent regulation of kinesin-mediated mitochondrial motility. Cell 2009 Jan 9; 136(1):163-74.
     
  • Pack-Chung E, Kurshan PT, Dickman DK, Schwarz TL. A Drosophila kinesin required for synaptic bouton formation and synaptic vesicle transport. Nat Neurosci 2007 Aug; 10(8):980-9.

For a list of Thomas Schwarz's publications on PubMed, click here.

 

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