MEDICAL SERVICES

EDUCATION

Medical School

  • Marmara University School of Medicine , 2004 , Istanbul , Turkey

Residency

Pediatrics
  • Istanbul University Faculty of Medicine , 2011 , Istanbul , Turkey

Residency

Pediatrics
  • SUNY Downstate Medical Center , 2012 , Brooklyn , NY

Residency

Pediatrics
  • SUNY Downstate Medical Center , 2014 , Brooklyn , NY

Fellowship

Newborn Medicine
  • Tufts Medical Center , 2017 , Boston , MA

Philosophy of Care

In the Boston Children’s Hospital (BCH) Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) our philosophy is to ensure that every patient receives the best care for the best possible outcomes. We consider our “patient” to be the baby and the family; we are constantly striving to serve the needs of both. This requires a team based approach with all members being essential. I am happy to be part of the Newborn Medicine team at Boston Children's Hospital. I came here following my passion to help children specifically newborns who are at high risk. BCH gave me an opportunity to work with skilled experts to provide excellent clinical care and also to contribute to improve care with ongoing education and research.  

PROFESSIONAL HISTORY

Diana Yanni, MD obtained her medical degree at Marmara University School of Medicine in Istanbul, Turkey. After completing pediatric residency in Istanbul, she moved to U.S. with the goal of continuing her research on neurodevelopmental outcomes of extremely premature born children. After doing pediatric residency again in New York, she came to Boston for fellowship at Tufts Medical Center. She is currently working in the NICU at Boston Children's Hospital and Special Care Nursery at Winchester Hospital. She will be seeing children at Infant Follow-up Program at Boston Children's Hospital. 

CERTIFICATIONS

  • American Board of Pediatrics, General Pediatrics
  • American Board of Pediatrics, Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine

PUBLICATIONS

Publications powered by Harvard Catalyst Profiles

  1. Yanni D, Korzeniewski SJ, Allred EN, Fichorova RN, O'Shea TM, Kuban K, Dammann O, Leviton A. Both antenatal and postnatal inflammation contribute information about the risk of brain damage in extremely preterm newborns. Pediatr Res. 2017 Oct; 82(4):691-696. View abstract