Jeff Waugh, M.D., Ph.D.

Assistant in Neurology; Director, Movement Disorders and Deep Brain Stimulation Program

Instructor of Neurology, Harvard Medical School

    Contact: 617-355-8235
  • Fax: 617-730-0279

"My goal is to understand the structural alterations that subserve dystonia, to understand the factors that influence the spread of dystonia from one body area (focal) to involve most of the body (generalized), and to identify brain regions that are potential targets for therapeutic intervention by deep brain stimulation."

Medical Services

Specialties

  • Movement Disorders

Departments

  • Neurology

Languages

  • English
To schedule an appointment: Call 617-355-8235 or Request an Appointment

I am a physician-scientist whose clinical and research interests converge in the study dystonia, a highly-disabling movement disorder that leads muscles to stiffen, twist, and contort the sufferer.  

Twenty percent of my time is spent directing the Pediatric Movement Disorders and Deep Brain Stimulation Program, the only such program in New England. This position allows us to capture the bulk of children with dystonia in Massachusetts, and through the quaternary referral base of Boston Children’s and Massachusetts General Hospitals, we have recruited dystonia patients from many parts of the United States and the world.  The remaining 80% of my time is spent researching the maladaptive motor control networks that, we believe, are the pathophysiologic underpinnings of dystonia.

Though dystonia is the third-most common movement disorder (incidence of 1:1000) and we have identified many genetic and brain-injury causes, we do not understand the mechanism by which these diverse insults can sum to produce the common features of dystonia. My goal is to understand the structural alterations that subserve dystonia, to understand the factors that influence the spread of dystonia from one body area (focal) to involve most of the body (generalized), and to identify brain regions that are potential targets for therapeutic intervention by deep brain stimulation.

Experience and Education

Education

Undergraduate Degree

Washington University, 1999

St. Louis, MO

Doctoral Degree

University of Texas Southwestern at Dallas, School of Biomedical Sciences, 2007

Houston, TX

Medical School

University of Texas, School of Medicine, 2007

Dallas, TX

Residency

Children’s Medical Center Dallas, 2009

Dallas, TX

Residency, Pediatric Neurology

Boston Children's Hospital, 2012

Boston, MA

Fellowship, Pediatric Movement Disorders

Massachusetts General Hospital, 2014

Boston, MA

Certifications

  • Pediatric Neurology

Research

Education in medical billing benefits both neurology trainees and academic departments, Waugh J L , Neurology, 83(20): 1856-1861.

Accompanying editorial

The third leg of neurology training: The business of medicine , Kaminski HJ and Busis N, Neurology 83(20): 1778-1779.

Publications

Publications powered by Harvard Catalyst Profiles
  1. Waugh JL, Kuster JK, Levenstein JM, Makris N, Multhaupt-Buell TJ, Sudarsky LR, Breiter HC, Sharma N, Blood AJ. Thalamic Volume Is Reduced in Cervical and Laryngeal Dystonias. PLoS One. 2016; 11(5):e0155302.
  2. Dy ME, Chang FC, Jesus SD, Anselm I, Mahant N, Zeilman P, Rodan LH, Foote KD, Tan WH, Eskandar E, Sharma N, Okun MS, Fung VS, Waugh JL. Treatment of ADCY5-Associated Dystonia, Chorea, and Hyperkinetic Disorders With Deep Brain Stimulation: A Multicenter Case Series. J Child Neurol. 2016 Jul; 31(8):1027-35.
  3. de Gusmao CM, Kok F, Casella EB, Waugh JL. Benign hereditary chorea related to NKX2-1 with ataxia and dystonia. Neurol Genet. 2016 Feb; 2(1):e40.
  4. Aravamuthan BR, Waugh JL. Localization of Basal Ganglia and Thalamic Damage in Dyskinetic Cerebral Palsy. Pediatr Neurol. 2016 Jan; 54:11-21.
  5. Waugh JL. Education in medical billing benefits both neurology trainees and academic departments. Neurology. 2014 Nov 11; 83(20):1856-61.
  6. Guerriero RM, Pier DB, de Gusmão CM, Bernson-Leung ME, Maski KP, Urion DK, Waugh JL. Increased pediatric functional neurological symptom disorders after the Boston marathon bombings: a case series. Pediatr Neurol. 2014 Nov; 51(5):619-23.
  7. de Gusmão CM, Guerriero RM, Bernson-Leung ME, Pier D, Ibeziako PI, Bujoreanu S, Maski KP, Urion DK, Waugh JL. Functional neurological symptom disorders in a pediatric emergency room: diagnostic accuracy, features, and outcome. Pediatr Neurol. 2014 Aug; 51(2):233-8.
  8. Schwenk H, Ramirez-Avila L, Sheu SH, Wuthrich C, Waugh J, Was A, Degirolami U, Burchett S, Koralnik IJ, Ahmed A. Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy in pediatric patients: case report and literature review. Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2014 Apr; 33(4):e99-105.
  9. Waugh JL, Sharma N. Clinical neurogenetics: dystonia from phenotype to genotype. Neurol Clin. 2013 Nov; 31(4):969-86.
  10. Waugh JL. Acute dyskinetic reaction in a healthy toddler following methylphenidate ingestion. Pediatr Neurol. 2013 Jul; 49(1):58-60.
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  12. Waugh J, Plumb P, Rollins N, Dowling MM. Prolonged direct catheter thrombolysis of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis in children: a case series. J Child Neurol. 2012 Mar; 27(3):337-45.
  13. Waugh J, Prabhu SP, Bourgeois B, Kothare S. Clinical reasoning: a 16-year-old girl with fixed unilateral grimace. Neurology. 2011 Sep 13; 77(11):e61-4.
  14. Waugh JL, Miller VS, Chudnow RS, Dowling MM. Juvenile Huntington disease exacerbated by methylphenidate: case report. J Child Neurol. 2008 Jul; 23(7):807-9.
To schedule an appointment: Call 617-355-8235 or Request an Appointment

Locations

We are grateful to have been ranked #1 on U.S. News & World Report's list of the best children's hospitals in the nation for the third year in a row, an honor we could not have achieved without the patients and families who inspire us to do our very best for them. Thanks to you, Boston Children's is a place where we can write the greatest children's stories ever told.”
- Sandra L. Fenwick, President and CEO

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