Michael Singh, MD

Michael Singh, MD

Co-Director, Adult Marfan Syndrome/Connective Tissue Disorder Clinic; Inpatient Director, Boston Adult Congenital Heart/Pulmonary Hypertension Service; Cardiovascular Genetics Service

Instructor of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School

Medical Services

Specialties

  • Adult Congenital Heart Disease
  • Genetics of Congenital Heart Disease
  • Cardiovascular Genetics
  • Internal Medicine
  • Pulmonary Hypertension
  • Cardiology

Departments

  • Cardiology

Languages

  • English

Programs

  • Adult Congenital Heart Service
  • Cardiovascular Program
  • Cardiovascular Genetics Program
To schedule an appointment: Call 617-355-6508 or Request an Appointment
Michael Singh, MD

Dr. Michael Singh is originally from Takoma Park, Maryland and first came to Boston for his fellowships at Boston Children’s and Brigham and Women’s Hospital in 2003.  

Dr. Singh is acutely aware of the unique challenges patients with congenital heart disease and cardiovascular genetic conditions face as they age out of pediatric care, and has dedicated his cardiology practice to this population. Dr. Singh is committed to providing top-quality, lifelong care to his patients, who range from teenagers to adults in their golden years. Dr. Singh’s particular interests include aortopathies and aortic health in Marfan Syndrome and related connective tissue disorders, congenital heart conditions such as tetralogy of Fallot, coarctation of the aorta, single ventricle/Fontan and bicuspid aortic valve, and caring for patients with congenital heart disease and connective tissue disorder through pregnancy.

Experience and Education

Education

Undergraduate Degree

Columbia Union College, 1992

Takoma Park, MD

Medical Degree

Loma Linda University, 1996

Loma Linda, CA

Internship

Medical College of Ohio, 1997

Toledo, OH

Residency

Medical College of Ohio, 2000

Toledo, OH

Fellowship

Baystate Medical Center- Tufts University of Medicine, 2003

Boston, MA

Fellowship

Boston Children's Hospital/ Brigham & Women's Hospital, 2004

Boston, MA

Certifications

  • Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular Disease, Pediatrics

Professional History

Dr. Singh completed his M.D. at Loma Linda University Medical Center in California; Internal Medicine/Pediatric residency at the Medical College of Ohio; Adult Cardiovascular Disease fellowship at Baystate Medical Center-Tufts University of Medicine in Massachusetts; and Marfan Syndrome/Connective Tissue Disorder and Adult Congenital Heart Disease fellowships at Boston Children's Hospital and Brigham & Women’s Hospital. In addition to being co-director of the Adult Marfan Sydrome/Related Connective Tissue Disorder and Aortic Disease program of the Cardiovascular Genetics Service, he is also the inpatient director of the Boston Adult Congenital Heart (BACH)/Pulmonary Hypertension service. He is a staff cardiologist at the Brigham & Women’s Hospital and Boston Children's Hospital. His clinical efforts have centered on supporting existing programs in congenital heart disease, pulmonary hypertension, and pregnancy in congenital heart disease, currently spanning Brigham & Women’s Hospital and Boston Children’s Hospital, as well as, the establishment of regional center of excellence for adolescents and adults with Marfan syndrome and related connective tissue disorders at both Brigham & Women’s Hospital and Boston Children's Hospital. His research interests include aortic health, and database direction and development of outcomes assessment tools.

Publications

Publications powered by Harvard Catalyst Profiles
  1. Prakash A, Adlakha H, Rabideau N, Hass CJ, Morris SA, Geva T, Gauvreau K, Singh MN, Lacro RV. Response to Letters Regarding Article "Segmental Aortic Stiffness in Children and Young Adults With Connective Tissue Disorders: Relationships With Age, Aortic Size, Rate of Dilation, and Surgical Root Replacement". Circulation. 2016 Feb 16; 133(7):e405.
  2. Opotowsky AR, Baraona F, Owumi J, Loukas B, Singh MN, Valente AM, Wu F, Cheng S, Veldtman G, Rimm EB, Landzberg MJ. Galectin-3 Is Elevated and Associated With Adverse Outcomes in Patients With Single-Ventricle Fontan Circulation. J Am Heart Assoc. 2016 Jan; 5(1).
  3. Singh MN, Lacro RV. Recent Clinical Drug Trials Evidence in Marfan Syndrome and Clinical Implications. Can J Cardiol. 2016 Jan; 32(1):66-77.
  4. Prakash A, Adlakha H, Rabideau N, Hass CJ, Morris SA, Geva T, Gauvreau K, Singh MN, Lacro RV. Segmental Aortic Stiffness in Children and Young Adults With Connective Tissue Disorders: Relationships With Age, Aortic Size, Rate of Dilation, and Surgical Root Replacement. Circulation. 2015 Aug 18; 132(7):595-602.
  5. Bhatt AB, Buck JS, Zuflacht JP, Milian J, Kadivar S, Gauvreau K, Singh MN, Creager MA. Distinct effects of losartan and atenolol on vascular stiffness in Marfan syndrome. Vasc Med. 2015 Aug; 20(4):317-25.
  6. Wu FM, Jonas MM, Opotowsky AR, Harmon A, Raza R, Ukomadu C, Landzberg MJ, Singh MN, Valente AM, Egidy Assenza G, Perez-Atayde AR. Portal and centrilobular hepatic fibrosis in Fontan circulation and clinical outcomes. J Heart Lung Transplant. 2015 Jul; 34(7):883-91.
  7. Opotowsky AR, Moko LE, Ginns J, Rosenbaum M, Greutmann M, Aboulhosn J, Hageman A, Kim Y, Deng LX, Grewal J, Zaidi AN, Almansoori G, Oechslin E, Earing M, Landzberg MJ, Singh MN, Wu F, Vaidya A. Pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma in cyanotic congenital heart disease. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2015 Apr; 100(4):1325-34.
  8. Wu FM, Opotowsky AR, Raza R, Harney S, Ukomadu C, Landzberg MJ, Valente AM, Breitbart RE, Singh MN, Gauvreau K, Jonas MM. Transient elastography may identify Fontan patients with unfavorable hemodynamics and advanced hepatic fibrosis. Congenit Heart Dis. 2014 Sep-Oct; 9(5):438-47.
  9. Clair M, Fernandes SM, Khairy P, Graham DA, Krieger EV, Opotowsky AR, Singh MN, Colan SD, Meijboom EJ, Landzberg MJ. Aortic valve dysfunction and aortic dilation in adults with coarctation of the aorta. Congenit Heart Dis. 2014 May-Jun; 9(3):235-43.
  10. Assenza GE, Graham DA, Landzberg MJ, Valente AM, Singh MN, Bashir A, Fernandes S, Mortele KJ, Ukomadu C, Volpe M, Wu F. MELD-XI score and cardiac mortality or transplantation in patients after Fontan surgery. Heart. 2013 Apr; 99(7):491-6.
  11. Show all
  12. Opotowsky AR, Perlstein T, Landzberg MJ, Colan SD, O'Gara PT, Body SC, Ryan LF, Aranki S, Singh MN. A shifting approach to management of the thoracic aorta in bicuspid aortic valve. J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2013 Aug; 146(2):339-46.
  13. Fernandes S, Khairy P, Graham DA, Colan SD, Galvin TC, Sanders SP, Singh MN, Bhatt A, Lacro RV. Bicuspid aortic valve and associated aortic dilation in the young. Heart. 2012 Jul; 98(13):1014-9.
  14. Morris SA, Orbach DB, Geva T, Singh MN, Gauvreau K, Lacro RV. Increased vertebral artery tortuosity index is associated with adverse outcomes in children and young adults with connective tissue disorders. Circulation. 2011 Jul 26; 124(4):388-96.
  15. Guo DC, Papke CL, Tran-Fadulu V, Regalado ES, Avidan N, Johnson RJ, Kim DH, Pannu H, Willing MC, Sparks E, Pyeritz RE, Singh MN, Dalman RL, Grotta JC, Marian AJ, Boerwinkle EA, Frazier LQ, LeMaire SA, Coselli JS, Estrera AL, Safi HJ, Veeraraghavan S, Muzny DM, Wheeler DA, Willerson JT, Yu RK, Shete SS, Scherer SE, Raman CS, Buja LM, Milewicz DM. Mutations in smooth muscle alpha-actin (ACTA2) cause coronary artery disease, stroke, and Moyamoya disease, along with thoracic aortic disease. Am J Hum Genet. 2009 May; 84(5):617-27.
  16. Singh MN. Care of the adult with congenital heart disease. Curr Treat Options Cardiovasc Med. 2008 Dec; 10(6):505-15.
  17. Wolford HY, Surowiec SM, Hsu JH, Rhodes JM, Singh MJ, Shortell CK, Illig KA, Green RM, Waldman DL, Davies MG. Stacked proximal aortic cuffs: an "off-the-shelf" solution for treating focal thoracic aortic pathology. J Endovasc Ther. 2005 Oct; 12(5):574-8.
To schedule an appointment: Call 617-355-6508 or Request an Appointment

Locations

We are grateful to have been ranked #1 on U.S. News & World Report's list of the best children's hospitals in the nation for the third year in a row, an honor we could not have achieved without the patients and families who inspire us to do our very best for them. Thanks to you, Boston Children's is a place where we can write the greatest children's stories ever told.”
- Sandra L. Fenwick, President and CEO

Boston Children's Hospital 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115 617-355-6000 | 800-355-7944

Close