Cynthia Rooney

Cynthia Rooney, MD, RN, PNP

Assistant in Neurology

Instructor of Neurology, Harvard Medical School

  • Contact: 781-216-3763

  • Fax: 781-216-3793

"My philosophy is to give the best care possible to each and every patient."

Medical Services

Specialties

  • Epilepsy Seizures
  • Headaches
  • Neurology
  • Neurology

Departments

  • Neurology

Languages

  • English

Programs

  • Behavioral Neurology
To schedule an appointment: Call 781-216-3763 or Request an Appointment

Experience and Education

Education

Medical School

Universidad Autonoma de Guadalajara, 1983

Guadalajara, Mexico

Internship

Pediatrics-Boston Floating Hospital, 1984-1985

Boston, Massachusetts

Residency

Pediatrics-Boston Floating Hospital, 1985-1987

Boston, Massachusetts

Fellowship

Neurology-Boston Floating Hospital, 1987-1990

Boston, Massachusetts

Certifications

  • American Board of Pediatrics

Professional History

My Area of Excellence is Clinical Expertise and Innovation.  Specifically, I am a clinical pediatric neurologist who specializes in epilepsy and headache disorders.
 

As a practicing neurologist at Children’s Hospital Physicians in South Weymouth, MA, I care for patients with complex neurologic problems including refractory epilepsy and headache disorders. 

I have published 5 original articles and was first author on one of these and senior author on another.  Two of these 5 articles were published recently, in 2010, and involve genetic testing for autism spectrum disorder and the identification of mutations in the gene for neurexin-1 (NRXN1) that can lead to autism spectrum disorders and other developmental disorders.  As a participant in the Autism Consortium Clinical Genetics/DNA Diagnostics Collaboration, I assisted in testing patients for autism spectrum disorders (ASD) using currently recommended clinical genetic testing as well as chromosomal microarray analysis, which did not have established guidelines.  This study showed that the chromosomal microarray analysis had the highest detection rate among clinically available genetic tests for patients with ASD, resulting in a recommendation that CMA be considered as part of the initial diagnostic evaluation of patients with ASD.  For the second study, which was conducted by the Division of Developmental Medicine at Children’s Hospital Boston, I assisted with a medical record review of subjects with deletions involving exonic sequences of NRXN1, which indicated that deletions of NRXN1 predispose to a wide spectrum of developmental disorders.  Thus, my clinical work contributes important data that is improving our understanding of autism spectrum disorders.

In summary, I apply my expertise in pediatric epilepsy and headache disorders in specialized clinical programs in the Department of Neurology, serve as an educator in this arena, and contribute to research that increases our understanding of these disorders.

Publications

Publications powered by Harvard Catalyst
  1. Ching MS, Shen Y, Tan WH, Jeste SS, Morrow EM, Chen X, Mukaddes NM, Yoo SY, Hanson E, Hundley R, Austin C, Becker RE, Berry GT, Driscoll K, Engle EC, Friedman S, Gusella JF, Hisama FM, Irons MB, Lafiosca T, LeClair E, Miller DT, Neessen M, Picker JD, Rappaport L, Rooney CM, Sarco DP, Stoler JM, Walsh CA, Wolff RR, Zhang T, Nasir RH, Wu BL. Deletions of NRXN1 (neurexin-1) predispose to a wide spectrum of developmental disorders. Am J Med Genet B Neuropsychiatr Genet. 2010 Jun 5; 153B(4):937-47.
  2. Frye RE, Donner E, Golja A, Rooney CM. Folinic acid-responsive seizures presenting as breakthrough seizures in a 3-month-old boy. J Child Neurol. 2003 Aug; 18(8):562-9.
  3. Gleeson JG, Minnerath SR, Fox JW, Allen KM, Luo RF, Hong SE, Berg MJ, Kuzniecky R, Reitnauer PJ, Borgatti R, Mira AP, Guerrini R, Holmes GL, Rooney CM, Berkovic S, Scheffer I, Cooper EC, Ricci S, Cusmai R, Crawford TO, Leroy R, Andermann E, Wheless JW, Dobyns WB, Walsh CA, et al. Characterization of mutations in the gene doublecortin in patients with double cortex syndrome. Ann Neurol. 1999 Feb; 45(2):146-53.
To schedule an appointment: Call 781-216-3763 or Request an Appointment

Locations

We are grateful to have been ranked #1 on U.S. News & World Report's list of the best children's hospitals in the nation for the third year in a row, an honor we could not have achieved without the patients and families who inspire us to do our very best for them. Thanks to you, Boston Children's is a place where we can write the greatest children's stories ever told.”
- Sandra L. Fenwick, President and CEO

Boston Children's Hospital 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115 617-355-6000 | 800-355-7944

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