The greatest joy of my practice is being able to support families as their infants grow into childhood and beyond.

EDUCATION

Undergraduate Degree

  • Harvard University , 2002 , Cambridge , MA

Medical School

  • University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine , 2007 , Philadelphia , PA

Residency

  • Children's Hospital of Philadelphia , 2009 , Philadelphia , PA

Residency

Pediatric Neurology
  • Boston Children's Hospital , 2012 , Boston , MA

Fellowship

Behavioral Neurology
  • Boston Children's Hospital , 2014 , Boston , MA

Philosophy of Care

As the child of a clinical psychologist and scientist, I have always been interested in linking human experience with underlying biology. As part of the Cardiac Neurodevelopmental Program, I have the wonderful privilege of being able to work with children and their families over many years. The greatest joy of my practice is being able to support families as their infants grow into childhood and beyond.

My focus is to be a compassionate physician who is continually bringing the latest in clinical research on cardioneurology to the precious children entrusted to us.

PROFESSIONAL HISTORY

I am a neurologist focusing on understanding neurological outcomes in congenital heart disease. Through my clinical care, I am uniquely situated to allow my patient experiences to inform our research. At the same time, I am able to provide families with information about the latest research advances in the field. By intertwining clinical care and research, I strive to bring a richer perspective to both research and to my patients and their families.


My clinical work is as a neurologist with the Cardiac Neurodevelopmental Neurology Program. Here I treat conditions such as developmental delay, motor concerns, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and learning disabilities. I also see patients in the neurology consultation service.


My research lies at the intersection of neurology and cardiology, aiming to illuminate the neurobiological underpinnings of neurodevelopmental impairment in congenital heart disease.


Currently, I am the Principal Investigator of a fetal MRI study that investigates fetal brain measurements in congenital heart disease to determine whether in utero markers of abnormal brain development can be identified. The ultimate goal of the study is to establish neurobiological targets for fetal neuroprotective intervention and identify those patients most likely to benefit from such therapy.

CERTIFICATIONS

  • American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology, Child and Adolescent Neurology

PUBLICATIONS

Publications powered by Harvard Catalyst Profiles

  1. Rollins CK, Newburger JW, Roberts AE. Genetic contribution to neurodevelopmental outcomes in congenital heart disease: are some patients predetermined to have developmental delay? Curr Opin Pediatr. 2017 Oct; 29(5):529-533. View abstract
  2. Im K, Guimaraes A, Kim Y, Cottrill E, Gagoski B, Rollins C, Ortinau C, Yang E, Grant PE. Quantitative Folding Pattern Analysis of Early Primary Sulci in Human Fetuses with Brain Abnormalities. AJNR Am J Neuroradiol. 2017 Jul; 38(7):1449-1455. View abstract
  3. Marami B, Mohseni Salehi SS, Afacan O, Scherrer B, Rollins CK, Yang E, Estroff JA, Warfield SK, Gholipour A. Temporal slice registration and robust diffusion-tensor reconstruction for improved fetal brain structural connectivity analysis. Neuroimage. 2017 Aug 01; 156:475-488. View abstract
  4. Gholipour A, Rollins CK, Velasco-Annis C, Ouaalam A, Akhondi-Asl A, Afacan O, Ortinau CM, Clancy S, Limperopoulos C, Yang E, Estroff JA, Warfield SK. A normative spatiotemporal MRI atlas of the fetal brain for automatic segmentation and analysis of early brain growth. Sci Rep. 2017 03 28; 7(1):476. View abstract
  5. Rollins CK, Asaro LA, Akhondi-Asl A, Kussman BD, Rivkin MJ, Bellinger DC, Warfield SK, Wypij D, Newburger JW, Soul JS. White Matter Volume Predicts Language Development in Congenital Heart Disease. J Pediatr. 2017 Feb; 181:42-48.e2. View abstract
  6. Rollins CK. A mixed bag: Differential influences of oxygenation and perfusion on brain development in congenital heart disease. J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2016 Oct; 152(4):960-1. View abstract
  7. Rollins CK, Newburger JW. Cardiology patient page. Neurodevelopmental outcomes in congenital heart disease. Circulation. 2014 Sep 30; 130(14):e124-6. View abstract
  8. Rollins CK, Watson CG, Asaro LA, Wypij D, Vajapeyam S, Bellinger DC, DeMaso DR, Robertson RL, Newburger JW, Rivkin MJ. White matter microstructure and cognition in adolescents with congenital heart disease. J Pediatr. 2014 Nov; 165(5):936-44.e1-2. View abstract
  9. Olson H, Shen Y, Avallone J, Sheidley BR, Pinsky R, Bergin AM, Berry GT, Duffy FH, Eksioglu Y, Harris DJ, Hisama FM, Ho E, Irons M, Jacobsen CM, James P, Kothare S, Khwaja O, Lipton J, Loddenkemper T, Markowitz J, Maski K, Megerian JT, Neilan E, Raffalli PC, Robbins M, Roberts A, Roe E, Rollins C, Sahin M, Sarco D, Schonwald A, Smith SE, Soul J, Stoler JM, Takeoka M, Tan WH, Torres AR, Tsai P, Urion DK, Weissman L, Wolff R, Wu BL, Miller DT, Poduri A. Copy number variation plays an important role in clinical epilepsy. Ann Neurol. 2014 Jun; 75(6):943-58. View abstract
  10. Hermann RC, Rollins CK, Chan JA. Risk-adjusting outcomes of mental health and substance-related care: a review of the literature. Harv Rev Psychiatry. 2007 Mar-Apr; 15(2):52-69. View abstract
  11. Hermann RC, Rollins CK. Quality measurement in health care: a need for leadership amid a new federalism. Harv Rev Psychiatry. 2003 Jul-Aug; 11(4):215-9. View abstract