Tetralogy of Fallot | Diagnosis

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Contact the Congenital Heart Valve Program

How is tetralogy of Fallot diagnosed?

A pediatric cardiologist will listen to your baby’s heart and lungs, feel the baby’s pulses, measure the oxygen level in the blood (non-invasively) and use several tests to determine the diagnosis, including:

  • echocardiogram (cardiac ultrasound): An echocardiogram evaluates the structure and function of your child’s heart. This is often the initial test for evaluating the causes of symptoms and detecting heart abnormalities.
  • electrocardiogram (EKG): An EKG evaluates the electrical activity of your child’s heart. This is often the initial test for evaluating the causes of symptoms and detecting heart abnormalities.
  • chest x-ray: A conventional chest x-ray will evaluate the size and spatial relationships of the heart within the child’s chest.
  • cardiac catheterization: A cardiac catheterization provides detailed information, images and measurements about the structures inside the heart.
  • pulse oximetry: A non-invasive test that measures the amount of oxygen in the blood
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