Transverse Vaginal Septum in Children

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A transverse vaginal septum is a horizontal "wall" of tissue that has formed during embryologic development and essentially creates a blockage of the vagina. It can occur at many different levels of the vagina.

  • Your daughter may start to suspect she has a transverse vaginal septum when she finds that she has a normal hymeneal opening, but a wall of tissue blocking access to the rest of the vaginal canal.    
  • Some women have a small hole, called a fenestration, in the septum. During her period, she will find that blood takes longer than the usual four to seven days to flow out of the vagina.
  • If there is no hole and the septum is completely blocking the upper vagina from the lower vagina, menstrual blood will pool in the upper vagina and may cause abdominal pain.

How Boston Children's Hospital approaches transverse vaginal septum

At Children's Center for Congenital Anomalies of the Reproductive Tract, an interdisciplinary team of pediatricians, gynecologists, urogynecologists and colorectal surgeons will work to find the best treatment for your daughter's transverse vaginal septum.

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- Sandra L. Fenwick, President and CEO

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