Landau-Kleffner Syndrome in Children

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Overview

Landau-Kleffner Syndrome (LKS) is a rare neurological disorder. It is characterized by the sudden or gradual development of aphasia (the inability to understand or express language) and an abnormal electroencephalogram (EEG). LKS affects the parts of the brain that control comprehension and speech. The disorder usually occurs in children between the ages of 3 and 6 years old. Typically, children with LKS develop normally for the first few years but then lose their language skills.

How Boston Children's Hospital approaches LKS

The Augmentative Communication Program at Children's treats LKS. Our program is known internationally for its work with children and adults who are non-speaking or whose speech is severely impaired. The program provides comprehensive, state-of-the-art evaluation and treatment for children and adults with congenital or acquired disorders affecting expressive communication, comprehension, and computer access.

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