Conditions + Treatments

Symptoms & Causes of Inguinal Hernia

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What are the symptoms of a hernia?

Hernias usually occur in newborns but may not be noticeable for several weeks or months after birth.

Straining and crying do not cause hernias; however, the increased pressure in the abdomen can make a hernia more noticeable.

  • Inguinal hernias appear as a bulge or swelling in the groin or scrotum. The swelling may be more noticeable when the baby cries and may get smaller or go away when the baby relaxes. If your physician pushes gently on this bulge when the child is calm and lying down, it will usually get smaller or go back into the abdomen.
  • If the hernia is not reducible, then the loop of intestine may be caught in the weakened area of abdominal muscle. Symptoms that may be seen when this happens include the following:
    • a full, round abdomen
    • vomiting
    • pain or fussiness
    • redness or discoloration over the groin.
    • fever

Symptoms of a hernia may resemble other conditions or medical problems. Please consult your child's physician for a diagnosis.

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