Coronary artery fistula symptoms & causes in children

LIke ThisLIke ThisLIke ThisLIke ThisLIke This

Contact the Heart Center

What is a coronary artery fistula?

A coronary artery fistula is an abnormal connection between one of the coronary arteries and a heart chamber or another blood vessel. The coronary arteries are blood vessels that bring oxygen-rich blood to the heart.

“Fistula” means abnormal connection.

What causes coronary artery fistula?

A coronary artery fistula is often congenital, meaning that a child is born with it. It generally occurs when one of the coronary arteries fails to form properly when the baby is developing in the womb. The coronary artery abnormally attaches to one of the chambers of the heart (the atrium or ventricle) or another blood vessel (for example, the pulmonary artery).

Coronary artery fistula is a rare condition. Infants who are born with it sometimes also have other heart defects.

What are the symptoms of coronary artery fistula?

Infants with this condition usually don’t have any symptoms. If symptoms do occur, they can include:

We are grateful to have been ranked #1 on U.S. News & World Report's list of the best children's hospitals in the nation for the third year in a row, an honor we could not have achieved without the patients and families who inspire us to do our very best for them. Thanks to you, Boston Children's is a place where we can write the greatest children's stories ever told.”
- Sandra L. Fenwick, President and CEO

Boston Children's Hospital 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115 617-355-6000 | 800-355-7944

Close