Peter Sorger

Peter Sorger is the Otto Krayer Professor of Systems Pharmacology at Harvard Medical School. He received his AB from Harvard College and PhD from Trinity College, Cambridge University U.K., working under the supervision of Hugh Pelham. He trained as a postdoctoral fellow at the University of California, San Francisco with Harold Varmus and Andrew Murray. Prior to moving to HMS Peter served as a Professor of Biology and Biological Engineering at MIT. Sorger was cofounder of Merrimack Pharmaceuticals and Glencoe Software and is an advisor to multiple public and private companies and research institutes in the US, Europe and Japan.

Peter’s research focuses on the signal transduction networks controlling cell proliferation and death, dysregulation of these networks in cancer and inflammatory diseases and mechanisms of action of therapeutic drugs targeting signaling proteins. His group uses mathematical and experimental approaches to construct and test computational models of signaling in human and murine cells as a means to understand and predict responses to drugs applied individually and in combination. The Sorger group also develops open-source software for analyzing biological networks and drug mechanism of action and it participates in multiple collaborative programs working to improve data access and reproducibility. Recent research extends a systems pharmacology approach to analysis of clinical samples and interpretation of clinical trials.

As founding head of the Harvard Program in Therapeutic Science (HiTS) and its Laboratory Systems Pharmacology (LSP) Peter leads a multi-institutional effort to advance the basic and translational science used to develop new medicines, create novel drug combinations and identify responsive patients. The LSP applies systems approaches to understanding and mitigating adverse drug effects and to designing new clinical trials. The recently established Harvard-MIT Center of Regulatory Sciences focuses on improving how drugs are evaluated, brought to market and used in patients. HiTS includes faculty from seven institutions.