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A fighting chance for Eva

Early in 2015, Jennifer and Vincent Ramirez had everything they wanted — two healthy children: Violet, 5, and Vincent, 3, and they had just bought a new home in Salt Lake City. The couple decided to try for a third child. Jennifer learned she was pregnant in a few weeks. “Everything was going according to plan,” recalls Vincent. In July of 2015, the entire family packed into an exam room for Jennifer’s five-month ultrasound. “The doctor wasn’t talking much, and the ultrasound seemed to be taking longer than usual,” says Jennifer. After the ultrasound was done, the doctor asked the couple if they could put their children in another room while they discussed the results.“There’s something wrong with your baby’s head,” the doctor reported. The week after the ultrasound Jennifer had a fetal MRI.

Eva’s diagnoses:  An encephalocele and microcephaly. Read more.


A salute to Noah’s heroes

Noah Hamm has escaped death more times than his mother Danielle can count. And he’s only 3. Since Noah was born there have been three constants in his life: Noah’s knack for near misses, his family and a neonatologist/pulmonologist who’s always there with the right care for Noah … and the right words for his family. “I tell Larry [Dr. Larry Rhein] he’s our George Bailey,” says Noah’s mom Danielle. Larry gave me hope. Even when things were bad, I always felt better when Larry was there. Noah was a 29-week twin when Danielle’s water broke prematurely. “The only condition I thought I had to worry about after having a STAT C-section was prematurity,” she recalls. Six hours after Noah and his sister Dakotah were born at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, specialists told Danielle and her husband Brendan their newborn son needed surgery for esophageal atresia, a gap in his esophagus, and tracheoesophageal fistula, an abnormal connection between his esophagus and trachea. Read More.


Two perfect reasons to pay it forward

In 2008, Katie and Paul Litterer were living in New York City and expecting identical twins. When Katie was 26 weeks pregnant, they bought a house near Boston to be closer to family. The following week, Katie went into early labor, resulting in an emergency C-section and the premature birth of their daughters. Their new house would remain empty for months. Sophie arrived first at a tiny 1 pound, 15 ounces and let out a cry. Maddie followed her sister at an even tinier 1 pound, 10 ounces. “I didn’t hear anything,” Katie remembers. “They just ran out of the room with her". Read more.


Preemie Jace Perkins rocks 'n rolls through 137 days in the NICU

Melyssa Perkins was 25 weeks into a healthy pregnancy with her first child when she began to have abdominal pain. She called her local nurse who said she was probably dehydrated, but when water didn’t help and the pain increased, Melyssa and her husband Jamie rushed to nearby Beverly Hospital, where they discovered that she was fully dilated. Read more.



Ella’s story: Two rare diseases and the NICU roller coaster ride

“Everyone tells you that the NICU is a roller coaster ride. What they don’t tell you is that it’s a customized roller coaster ride just for you. You never know what’s coming at you next,” says Carrie Shea, whose daughter Ella spent her first three months of life in Boston Children’s Hospital NICU. Today, Ella is a “remarkably normal little girl,” says Carrie. It’s quite a feat for the three-year-old who was born with GACI (generalized arterial calcification of infancy), an extremely rare condition with an 85 percent mortality rate, and diagnosed with PKU (phenylketonuria), a second rare genetic disorder, a few weeks after birth.

We are grateful to have been ranked #1 on U.S. News & World Report's list of the best children's hospitals in the nation for the third year in a row, an honor we could not have achieved without the patients and families who inspire us to do our very best for them. Thanks to you, Boston Children's is a place where we can write the greatest children's stories ever told.”
- Sandra L. Fenwick, President and CEO

Boston Children's Hospital 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115 617-355-6000 | 800-355-7944

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