Conditions and Treatments from the Division of General Pediatrics

Mumps

Overview Mumps is a very contagious viral illness that usually makes a child have a fever and swollen salivary glands in his mouth and near his ear. It may also involve the central nervous system. It

Learn more
Childhood Obesity

Obesity occurs when a child is significantly over the ideal weight for her height. Like adults, children become obese when they eat more calories than they use. Obesity in children is determined by

Learn more
Apnea of Prematurity

Overview Apnea refers to what happens when a child doesn’t breathe for more than 20 seconds. It is more common in premature babies than in full-term babies. The more premature the baby, the greater

Learn more
Sealants

Overview Dental sealants are thin, plastic films painted on the surfaces of the back teeth-on molars and premolars, and are highly effective in preventing tooth decay (caries and cavities). Dental

Learn more
Autism Spectrum Disorder

What is autism spectrum disorder (ASD)? What does it mean if a child is “on the spectrum”? Can autism be treated? Will my child always have it? What supports can help our family? While there’s

Learn more
Bee Stings

Overview Bee stings are one of the unfortunate side effects of beautiful, warm weather and flowering greenery. For most people, bee stings are merely annoying, but for others, bee stings may be

Learn more
Chickenpox

Overview Before a vaccination was developed, almost every child got chickenpox — a highly contagious disease characterized by little blisters all over the body. Nowadays, the availability of an

Learn more
Cold

Overview A cold, also called an upper respiratory infection (URI), is a collection of symptoms and one of the most common illnesses, leading to more doctor visits and absences from school and work

Learn more
Cold sores

Cold sores, also called oral herpes or fever blisters, are small blisters around the mouth (including lips, chin, and cheeks) or in the nostrils. Episodes of the cold sores usually last no longer than

Learn more
Diaper Rash

Overview What is diapering? An essential part of every baby's care is diapering. Until a child is toilet-trained, usually by 3 years of age, diapers are used to collect urine and bowel movements. It

Learn more
Diarrhea

What is diarrhea in children? Diarrhea is defined as watery stool, increased frequency of bowel movement, or both. In most cases, diarrhea in children lasts no more than a few days and goes away on

Learn more
Fever

Overview Your child has a fever if her temperature is 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit or higher. The body has several ways to maintain normal body temperature. The body responds to changes in temperature by:

Learn more
Flu (Influenza) and H1N1

Overview Influenza, commonly know as the flu, is a highly contagious viral infection of the upper respiratory system, which includes the nose, bronchial tubes, and lungs. Because the H1N1 strain of

Learn more
Puncture Wounds

What is a puncture wound? It is common for children to have puncture wounds. A puncture wound is a deep wound made by a sharp object such as a nail or a jagged piece of metal or wood. Puncture wounds

Learn more
Stye (Hordeolum)

Overview A hordeolum, more commonly known as a stye, is an inflammation of part of the eyelash. Styes are seen more often in children than adults. A stye is caused by an infection in the oil-producing

Learn more
Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS)

Overview By working on SIDS research at Children's, I have the opportunity to make a direct contribution to human health care--the reason I wanted to be a research scientist in the first place. David

Learn more
Herpangina

Overview Herpangina is an illness caused by a virus, characterized by small blister-like bumps or ulcers that appear in the mouth, usually in the back of throat or the roof of the mouth. If your child

Learn more
Herpes Zoster (Shingles)

Herpes zoster, or shingles, is a common viral infection of the nerves, which results in a painful rash of small blisters on a strip of skin anywhere on the body. Even after the rash is gone, the pain

Learn more
Human Parainfluenza Viruses (HPIV)

Overview Human parainfluenza viruses (HPIV) are a group of viruses that cause different types of respiratory infections and are most common in children and babies. infections range from the common

Learn more
Lead Poisoning

Lead poisoning occurs when lead — a metal that was once a common ingredient in paint and is still used in batteries, pipes, pottery and even cosmetics — builds up in the body. Little by little, lead

Learn more
Meningococcal Infections

Overview Meningococcal infections are caused by a group of bacteria called Neisseria meningitidis. The most common forms of meningococcal infections include meningitis (infection of the membranes that

Learn more
Mold Allergy

A mold allergy is an abnormal response of your child’s body to mold

Learn more
Otitis Media

Overview Otitis media is inflammation centered in your child's middle ear. It often occurs after a cold, sore throat, or respiratory infection. More than 80 percent of children have at least one

Learn more
Perichondritis

Overview Perichondritis is an infection of the skin and tissue surrounding the cartilage of the outer ear. Perichondritis is usually caused by injury to the ear as a result of: ear piercing sports

Learn more
Phimosis and Paraphimosis

What is phimosis and paraphimosis? Phimosis is a constriction of the opening of the foreskin so that it cannot be drawn back over the tip of the penis. This condition is a normal occurrence in the

Learn more
Pneumonia

Pneumonia is an inflammation of the lungs caused by bacteria, viruses or chemical irritants. It is a serious infection in which air sacs in the lungs fill with pus and other liquid. Pneumonia may be

Learn more
Periodontal Diseases

Overview The word periodontal means "around the tooth." Periodontal diseases, also called gum diseases, are serious bacterial infections that destroy the gums and the surrounding tissues of the mouth.

Learn more
Prematurity

Overview A baby born before 37 weeks of pregnancy is considered premature. Slightly fewer than 12 percent of all babies are premature. Overall, the rate of premature births is rising, mainly due to

Learn more
School Refusal

Overview There are a few common reasons for your child's refusal to attend school. You might notice your child's phobia in these common situations: Going to school for the first time: This is a normal

Learn more
Scarlet Fever

Overview Scarlet fever, also known as scarlatina, is a contagious infection caused by the same bacteria that causes strep throat. In some cases, if your child has strep throat, she may also develop

Learn more
Splinters

What is a splinter? A splinter is a sharp sliver of wood, glass or other debris that is lodged underneath the skin. Removal of small, superficial splinters can usually be done at home. First-aid for

Learn more
Slow Weight Gain in Infants and Children

Overview Slow weight gain is sometimes called “failure to thrive." It is not in itself a disease, but rather is a manifestation of medical, social, and/or environmental factors that may prevent a

Learn more
Viruses Bacteria and Parasites in the Digestive Tract

Overview Viruses, bacteria and parasites are living organisms that are found all around us. They exist in water and soil, on the surfaces of foods that we eat and on surfaces that we touch, such as

Learn more
Vision Problems

Overview There are two types of eye disorders that can affect your child’s vision: refractive errors and non-refractive errors. Refractive errors, such as nearsightedness, farsightedness, crossed eyes

Learn more
Canker Sores (Aphthous Stomatitis)

Overview Canker sores, or aphthous stomatitis, is an illness that causes small ulcers to appear in the mouth, usually inside the lips, on the cheeks or on the tongue. Canker sores are usually seen in

Learn more
Chemical Burns

Chemical burns can occur when strong acids or alkalies come in contact with your child's skin or eyes. Caring for chemical burns: Rinse exposed area with running water for 20 minutes; a hose is

Learn more
Cavities (Tooth Decay)

Healthy teeth do not have cavities (holes in teeth). When children eat or drink anything with sugar or starch, bacteria in the mouth turn the sugars and starches into acids. The acids result in

Learn more
We are grateful to have been ranked #1 on U.S. News & World Report's list of the best children's hospitals in the nation for the third year in a row, an honor we could not have achieved without the patients and families who inspire us to do our very best for them. Thanks to you, Boston Children's is a place where we can write the greatest children's stories ever told.”
- Sandra L. Fenwick, President and CEO

Boston Children's Hospital 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115 617-355-6000 | 800-355-7944

Close