Tracks

The Boston Combined Residency Program in Pediatrics at Boston Children's Hospital and Boston Medical Center emphasizes training in general pediatrics for all residents, regardless of their ultimate career plans. The program offers two tracks:
  • Categorical Track (31 residents) -- emphasizing training in academic medicine and pediatric subspecialties
  • Urban Health and Advocacy Track (11 residents) -- emphasizing training in urban pediatrics, public policy and advocacy

Categorical Track

This track (NRMP #1259320C0) is designed for applicants who wish to focus on academic general or specialty pediatrics. Besides the strong educational base in general and subspecialty pediatrics, principles of academic leadership are actively taught throughout the three-year training program. About 85% of the Categorical track graduates enter subspecialty fellowships or academic general pediatrics fellowships, but some pursue pediatric practice, hospitalist positions, global health and health policy experiences, and health services research training programs.

Categorical track residents have opportunities for research funding, exposure to academic meetings and active mentoring by subspecialty faculty. Most residents participate in the standard three year curriculum; however, the two research tracks of the American Board of Pediatrics -- the Integrated Research Pathway and the Accelerated Research Pathway -- are available to housestaff pursuing academic research careers. In fact, the BCRP has had the most residents participate in these so-called “fast-tracking” pathways of any pediatric program in the country.

Categorical residents do approximately 70 percent of their training at Children's Hospital Boston and 30 percent of their training at Boston Medical Center.

Urban Health and Advocacy Track

This track (NRMP #1259320C1) was previously called the Primary Care Track but has been renamed to more accurately reflect its mission. It provides general pediatric training with an emphasis on experiences in the primary care of underserved children and their parents in an urban setting. This track allows residents to focus on their interests in general academic pediatrics, public health policy, advocacy, community pediatrics, and global health. Development of leaders in these areas is a goal of this track. Beginning in the PL2 year, Urban Health and Advocacy Track (UHAT) residents select an additional half-day experience to augment their training. Residents have the option of choosing between a second continuity clinic and a project in urban health, advocacy, international health or public policy. Those selecting a project are coupled with a faculty mentor throughout the PL2 and PL3 years. The UHAT curriculum is enhanced by monthly educational sessions on child health and advocacy, as well as by regularly scheduled evening seminars on health policy. Over the past two years these sessions have been augmented by the development of UHAT specific mentoring groups, which, under the direction of faculty leaders, provide an introduction in careers in global health, health services and health policy.

Many UHAT graduates have careers in academic medicine with a focus on health care issues of the urban poor, serving as researchers, advocates, community leaders and clinicians. They often practice in urban settings, and many pursue academic general pediatric fellowships, advocacy fellowships, masters programs in public health and health services research fellowships.

UHAT residents spend 40 percent of their time at Boston Medical Center and 60 percent at Children's Hospital. Inpatient general pediatrics rotations are spent primarily at Boston Medical Center in the PL-2 and PL-3 years.

Common Aspects

Both tracks are geared towards training outstanding general pediatricians. Rotations in the two tracks are very similar and all residents work at both institutions, but the faculties at Children's Hospital and Boston Medical Center have different interests and the two institutions have a different focus, which allows residents to focus upon their individual goals and take advantage of the diverse resources to explore and prepare for careers in virtually any aspect of pediatrics.

It is important to emphasize that residents in the two tracks are all part of the same program and function as one. They are totally integrated in all aspects of the program and, aside from the program leaders, few faculty or staff know which residents belong to which track.

As described in detail in the Application section, each track has a separate match number through the National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) and has a separate selection process. Applicants can apply to either one or both tracks. Because the tracks are quite similar and the program is highly unified, and because most applicant's interests overlap the missions of each track to some degree, most applicants should apply to both tracks.

Pediatrics - Anesthesiology

The BCRP was one of the first residency programs to offer combined training in Pediatrics and Anesthesia (NRMP #1259726C0). Residents spend their first year in pediatrics residency. The following year is the first year of anesthesia training, followed by three years of integrated residency training in both pediatrics and anesthesia. Throughout the three years of integrated training, while residents are doing core training in Pediatrics or Anesthesia, they attend conferences and participate in core clinical activities once a month in the other discipline to keep the combined program fully integrated. Individuals ideally suited for this combined training will likely pursue careers at the interface between critical care, pediatrics, and anesthesiology. Examples of such careers include hospitalist medicine, pain and palliative care, out of operating room procedural and sedations services, and members of integrated subspecialty teams in pediatrics, critical care and anesthesiology.

The program is described in detail here.

Combined Pediatrics - Medical Genetics 

The BCRP offers combined training in Pediatrics and Medical Genetics (NRMP #7652444017) starting with a complete year of pediatrics residency in year one and integrated training for the remaining four years, including a year of research.

The program is detailed here.

Combined Pediatrics - Child Neurology 

The BCRP offers two different Pediatrics-Child Neurology programs: one a joint program between the Categorical Track and the Child Neurology program at Boston Children’s Hospital (NRMP #1259185C0), and one between the Urban Health and Advocacy Track and the Child Neurology program at Boston Medical Center (NRMP #1257185C0). These two "Categorical" programs both begin with 2 years of general pediatrics in the appropriate track of the BCRP followed by three years of child neurology at either Boston Children's Hospital or the Boston Medical Center, depending on the program. Both child neurology programs also offer separate "Advanced" positions that are not linked to the BCRP, where the matched residents first complete their 2 years of general pediatrics in some other program.

The child neurology programs at Boston Children's Hospital are described in detail here.

The programs at Boston Medical Center are described here.

Neurodevelopmental Disabilities Preliminary Position

The BCRP offers one two-year Preliminary-NDD position (NRMP #1259320P1) to those who match in the Boston Children’s Hospital Neurodevelopmental Disabilities (NDD) training program (NRMP #1259186A0). NDD is an ACGME-accredited program combining 2-years of pediatric training with 4-years of training in adult and pediatric neurology, adult and pediatric NDD, and basic and clinical sciences. Children’s Hospital only offers an Advanced four-year NDD position, which begins in 2017. However, the linked BCRP Preliminary position allows applicants to complete their entire six-year NDD training in Boston. The NDD program is described here