Laboratories of Cognitive Neuroscience

Boston Children's Hospital Research under the direction of Charles A. Nelson, PhD, the Boston Children's Hospital Laboratories of Cognitive Neuroscience are dedicated to furthering our understanding of brain and cognitive development in typically developing infants and children, as well as children diagnosed with or at risk for various developmental disorders. In gaining a better understanding of these processes, our goal is to contribute to the healthy growth and development of our children.

Our multidisciplinary team of researchers brings together experts from a wide range of fields, including neuroscience, psychology, and education. In collaboration with clinical experts in fields such as developmental pediatrics and child neurology, we are working to expand our knowledge of child development and developmental disorders through cutting edge cognitive neuroscience research.

Our central areas of focus include the development of memory and face-processing, the impact of environmental factors such as stress on cognitive development, and growing research programs in autism, ADHD, and dyslexia. Through this collaborative and comprehensive approach, we aim to drive the science forward as rapidly as possible, so that we can translate what we learn into earlier identification, improved therapies, and better outcomes for children and families affected by developmental disorders.

The Nelson Laboratory

Dr. Nelson and his staff are studying a variety of questions related to brain and behavior development in infants and children. In particular they are interested in the role that experience plays in shaping these developmental pathways.

The Gaab Laboratory

Dr. Gaab and her staff are interested in brain and cognitive development in typically developing infants and children, as well as children diagnosed with, or at risk for, dyslexia.

The Faja Laboratory

Dr. Faja and her team are studying social and cognitive development in individuals with autism spectrum disorders, other neurodevelopmental disorders, and typical development.